Cover image for The invisible boy / by Trudy Ludwig ; illustrated by Patrice Barton.
Title:
The invisible boy / by Trudy Ludwig ; illustrated by Patrice Barton.
ISBN:
9781582464503

9781582464510
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, c2013.
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 26 cm.
Abstract:
Brian has always felt invisible at school, but when a new student, Justin, arrives, everything changes.
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Summary

Summary

Meet Brian, the invisible boy. Nobody ever seems to notice him or think to include him in their group, game, or birthday party . . . until, that is, a new kid comes to class.

When Justin, the new boy, arrives, Brian is the first to make him feel welcome. And when Brian and Justin team up to work on a class project together, Brian finds a way to shine.

From esteemed author and speaker Trudy Ludwig and acclaimed illustrator Patrice Barton, this gentle story shows how small acts of kindness can help children feel included and allow them to flourish. Any parent, teacher, or counselor looking for material that sensitively addresses the needs of quieter children will find The Invisible Boy a valuable and important resource.

Includes backmatter with discussion questions and resources for further reading.


Author Notes

Trudy Ludwig is an award-winning author who specializes in writing children's books that explore the colorful and sometimes confusing world of children's social interactions. She has received rave reviews nationwide from educators, experts, organizations, and parents for her passion and compassion in addressing relational aggression--the use of relationships to manipulate and hurt others. Trudy wrote her first book, My Secret Bully , after her own daughter was bullied by some friends. Since then, she has become a sought-after speaker, presenting at schools and conferences around the country and educating students, parents, and teachers on the topic.

Trudy has been profiled on national and regional television, radio, and newsprint. Children's books have always been Trudy's great passion. It was her daughter's experience which inspired Trudy to quit her freelance writing career to focus on making a difference in kids' lives, one book at a time.

Trudy lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband, two children, and their loyal hound dog, Hannah. She is a member of the International Bullying Prevention Association and collaborates with leading experts and organizations including The Ophelia Project, Hands & Words Are Not For Hurting Project, and Putting Family First.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

"Can you see Brian, the invisible boy?" Ludwig (Better Than You) asks readers. Brian's classmates seem to see right through him when it comes to the lunchroom, playground, or birthday parties. Even Brian's teacher is too busy with the kids who "take up a lot of space." A new kid named Justin notices Brian's kindness and drawing talent, and he matter-of-factly changes the paradigm ("Mrs. Carlotti said we can have up to three people in our group," Justin tells a classmate who wants to exclude Brian). Gradually, Brian-whom Barton (I Like Old Clothes) has heretofore depicted in b&w pencil with sad, vulnerable eyes-becomes a smiling, full-color character. Ludwig and Barton understand classroom dynamics (Barton is especially good at portraying how children gauge the attitude of their peers and act accordingly) and wisely refrain from lecturing readers or turning Justin into Brian's savior. Instead, they portray Brian's situation as a matter of groupthink that can be rebooted through small steps. It's a smart strategy, one that can be leveraged through the book's excellent discussion guide. Ages 6-9. Illustrator's agent: Christina A. Tugeau, CATugeau. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Shy Brian often goes unnoticed by his rowdier classmates. Then Brian comes out of his shell to make a first gesture of friendship with a new student, easing him into socialization. Digitally painted pencil sketches deftly convey Brian's gradual evolution from black-and-white "invisibility" to full-color inclusion by newfound friends. Helpful discussion questions and suggestions for further reading about introverted children are appended. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.