Cover image for 100 plants to feed the bees : provide a healthy habitat to help pollinators thrive / the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Eric Lee-Mäder, Jarrod Fowler, Jillian Vento & Jennifer Hopwood.
Title:
100 plants to feed the bees : provide a healthy habitat to help pollinators thrive / the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Eric Lee-Mäder, Jarrod Fowler, Jillian Vento & Jennifer Hopwood.
Title Variants:
One hundred plants to feed the bees
ISBN:
9781612127019

9781612128863
Publication Information:
North Adams, MA : Storey Publishing, [2016]

©2016
Physical Description:
239 pages : color illustrations, maps ; 21 cm
Abstract:
The international bee crisis is threatening our global food supply, but this user-friendly field guide shows what you can do to help protect our pollinators. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation offers browsable profiles of 100 common flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that attract bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds. The recommendations are simple: sow seeds for some plants — such as basil, rhododendron, and blueberries — and simply don’t mow down abundant native species, including aster, goldenrod, and milkweed. 100 Plants to Feed the Bees will empower homeowners, landscapers, apartment dwellers — anyone with a scrap of yard or a window box — to protect our pollinators.
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1 Bob Harkins Branch 571.8642 XER Book Adult General Collection
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Summary

Summary

The international bee crisis is threatening our global food supply, but this user-friendly field guide shows what you can do to help protect our pollinators. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation offers browsable profiles of 100 common flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that attract bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds. The recommendations are simple: sow seeds for some plants -- such as basil, rhododendron, and blueberries -- and simply don't mow down abundant native species, including aster, goldenrod, and milkweed. 100 Plants to Feed the Bees will empower homeowners, landscapers, apartment dwellers -- anyone with a scrap of yard or a window box -- to protect our pollinators.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Four experts from the Xerces Society-a nonprofit with the mission of invertebrate conservation-offer their all-star lineup of plants beneficial to pollinators. The 100 are divided into five groups: native wildflowers, native woody plants, introduced woody, introduced herbs and ornamentals, and native and nonnative bee pasture plants. Readers will learn about the requirements of each plant, growing zones, bloom time, the kinds of pollinators attracted, and usually some idea as to the honey yield and sugar content of its nectar. Geographical coverage is well balanced across all of the continental United States and Canada. Eric Lee-Mäder's introduction puts the book on firm footing with his mention of key historical insect preservationists and his review of the basic science of pollination. The catchy design reflects Storey's credo of "practicality": large, full-color primary images, minimal text, and purposeful graphics provide just enough information to get readers interested. VERDICT The authors' challenge of choosing just 100 plants is well met, though some readers will undoubtedly lament the absence of their own favorites. Gardeners concerned about their pollinator friends will be enthused, as will beginner apiarists.-Robert -Eagan, Windsor P.L., Ont. © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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