Cover image for Dear Ijeawele, or, A feminist manifesto in fifteen suggestions / Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
Title:
Dear Ijeawele, or, A feminist manifesto in fifteen suggestions / Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
Title Variants:
Feminist manifesto in fifteen suggestions
ISBN:
9780735273405
Edition:
First edition
Publication Information:
Toronto : Alfred A. Knopf Canada, 2017.

©2017
Physical Description:
63 pages ; 19 cm.
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1 Nechako Branch 305.42 ADI Book Adult General Collection
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Summary

Summary

An instant feminist classic, and perfect gift for all parents, women, and people working towards gender equality. Here is a brilliant, beautifully readable, and above all practical expansion of the ideas this iconic author began to explore in her bestselling manifesto, We Should All Be Feminists .

A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking how to raise her new baby girl a feminist.
Although she has written and spoken out widely about feminism, Adichie wasn't sure how to advise her friend Ijeawele. But as a person who'd babysat, had loved her nieces and nephews, and now, too, was the mother of a daughter herself, she thought she would try. So she sent Ijeawele a letter with some suggestions--15 in all--which she has now decided to share with the world.
Compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive, Dear Ijeawele offers specifics on how we can empower our daughters to become strong, independent women. Here, too, are ways parents can raise their children--both sons and daughters--beyond a culture's limiting gender prescriptions. This short, sharp work rings out in Chimamanda's voice: infused with deep honesty, clarity, strength, and above all love. She speaks to the important work of raising a girl in today's world, and provides her readers with a clear proposal for inclusive, nuanced thinking. Here we have not only a rousing manifesto, but a powerful gift for all people invested in the idea of creating a just society--an endeavour now more urgent and important than ever.


Author Notes

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Enugu, Nigeria on September 15, 1977. She studied medicine and pharmacy at the University of Nigeria for a year and a half before moving to the United States, where she studied communication at Drexel University for two years. She received a bachelor's degree in communication and political science at Eastern Connecticut State University in 2001, a master's degree in creative writing at Johns Hopkins University, and a master's degree in African Studies from Yale University in 2008.

Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, was published in 2003 and received the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book in 2005. Her other books include The Thing around Your Neck, Americanah, and We Should All Be Feminist. Half of a Yellow Sun won the Orange Prize in 2007.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

"Teach her that the idea of 'gender roles' is absolute nonsense." This excellent series of essays is award-winning author Adichie's (Americanah) response to a friend's question on how to raise her daughter as a feminist. Adichie shines a light on gender issues in modern society through wise advice dispensed with droll wit and deep earnestness. Writing with tender conviction about encouraging girls to pick up a helicopter instead of, or in addition to, a doll, Adichie explains that to be feminist, women do not have to give up their femininity. We may choose to be brides, but we should also be taught to be independent, that marriage isn't the only option. In other words, a mother should remain her own person, refusing to give up her identity, which is often used to justify oppression. But it's not just women learning to navigate the confusing waters of gender identity; Adichie also offers guidance for teaching men how to embrace feminism and reject rigid gender roles, too. VERDICT A fast read and vital addition to all collections. Anyone interested in social change will -enjoy.-Venessa Hughes, Buffalo, NY © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

When a couple of years ago a friend of mine from childhood, who'd grown into a brilliant, strong, kind woman, asked me to tell her how to raise her baby girl a feminist, my first thought was that I did not know. It felt like too huge a task. But I had spoken publicly about feminism and perhaps that made her feel I was an expert on the subject. I had over the years also helped care for many babies of loved ones; I had worked as a babysitter and helped raise my nephews and nieces. I had done a lot of watching and listening, and I had done even more thinking. In response to my friend's request, I decided to write her a letter, which I hoped would be honest and practical, while also serving as a map of sorts for my own feminist thinking. This book is a version of that letter, with some details changed. Now that I, too, am the mother of a delightful baby girl, I realize how easy it is to dispense advice about raising a child when you are not facing the enormously complex reality of it yourself. Still, I think it is morally urgent to have honest conversations about raising children differently, about trying to create a fairer world for women and men. My friend sent me a reply saying she would "try" to follow my suggestions. And in rereading these as a mother, I, too, am determined to try. Excerpted from Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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