Cover image for Tech generation : raising balanced kids in a hyper-connected world / Mike Brooks, Ph. D., and Jon Lasser, Ph. D.
Title:
Tech generation : raising balanced kids in a hyper-connected world / Mike Brooks, Ph. D., and Jon Lasser, Ph. D.
ISBN:
9780190665296
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2018]

©2018
Physical Description:
xii, 314 pages ; 22 cm
Contents:
Technology in our lives -- Is our technology making us any happier? -- The pull of our screens -- The effects of technology on children and families -- Foundations of the relationship -- Building the relationship -- The green light level : prevention -- The yellow light level : addressing emerging concerns -- The red light level : when strong intervention is necessary -- Parenting, technology, and schooling.
Abstract:
"Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World guides parents in teaching their children how to reap the benefits of living in a digital world while also preventing its negative effects. Mike Brooks and Jon Lasser, psychologists with extensive experience working with kids, parents, and teachers, combine cutting-edge research and expertise to create an engaging and helpful guide that emphasizes the importance of the parent-child relationship"-- Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

Parents often worry about raising kids in a tech-saturated world - the threats of cyberbullying, video game violence, pornography, and sexting may seem inescapable. And while these dangers exist, there is a much more common and subtle way that technology can cause harm: by eroding ourattention spans. Focused attention is fundamental to maintaining quality relationships, but our constant interaction with screens and social media is shortening our attention spans - which takes a toll on our personal connections with friends and family and our ability to form real relationships. Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World guides parents in teaching their children how to reap the benefits of living in a digital world while also preventing its negative effects. Mike Brooks and Jon Lasser, psychologists with extensive experience working with kids,parents, and teachers, combine cutting-edge research and expertise to create an engaging and helpful guide that emphasizes the importance of the parent-child relationship. They reject an "all or nothing" attitude towards technology, in favor of a balanced approach that neither idealizes nordemonizes the digital. Brooks and Lasser provide strategies for preventing technology from becoming problematic in the first place; steps for addressing problems when they arise; and ways of intervening when problems are out of control. They also discuss the increasingly challenging issue oftechnology use in schools, and how parents can collaborate with educators when concerns arise over kids' use of technology.


Author Notes

Dr. Mike Brooks is a licensed psychologist and licensed specialist in school psychology. He is the director of the Austin Psychology and Assessment Center (ApaCenter). He received his doctorate in Educational Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin. He has a wealth of expertise intechnology and gaming addiction, positive psychology, the needs of children and teens, and effective parenting practices. He is a frequent presenter on these topics, and maintains a website, www.TechHappyLife.com, devoted to the challenge of living a balanced life in a technological world. Dr. Jon Lasser is Associate Dean for Research for the College of Education and Professor of School Psychology at Texas State University. He earned his doctorate in Educational Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin and his master's degree in Human Sexuality Education from the Universityof Pennsylvania. He is a licensed psychologist and licensed specialist in school psychology (LSSP) in Texas. He co-authored Grow Happy and Grow Grateful as well as School Psychologist as Counselor: A Practitioner's Handbook. He works with children and families in private practice.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Educational psychologists Brooks and Lasser have created a serviceable, if less than timely, handbook showing families how to get the best from technology while minimizing its negative effects. Their Tech Happy Life model, with its color-coded levels-green for preventing problems, yellow for addressing emerging concerns, and red for intervening when things get difficult or dangerous-calls for "warm" yet limit-setting and "authoritative" parenting. They set the scene by warning that when kids' screen-time gets "out of balance," the result is sleep loss, distractibility, diminished face-to-face interaction, shorter attention span, decreased productivity, limited physical activity, loss of interest in recreational activities, and a decreased sense of well-being. The allure of the screen is powerful and ever-present, the authors write, and uncooperative kids who won't relinquish their devices may isolate themselves or underperform at school. But, Brooks and Lasser say, if parents model good behavior by limiting their own screen time, communicate effectively, set appropriate boundaries, and levy consequences, they will help kids learn self-regulation and achieve balance on their own. Plenty of other books have already addressed the screen-time issue, often in greater detail, but parents should find Brooks and Lasser's advice to be easily understood and solidly commonsensical. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Cyberbullying, video-game violence, and sexting are common anxieties for parents. But an imbalanced use of technology isn't a problem only for children; studies show that 28 percent of teens believe their parents are addicted to their phones. -Coauthors and school psychologists Brooks (director, Austin Psychology and Assessment Ctr.; -techhappylife.com) and Lasser (associate dean, Coll. of Education, Texas State Univ.) argue that screen time has become so integrated into our daily routines that we can't imagine existing without it. Have we become servants to technology? Brooks and Lasser answer, yes. Struggles with delayed gratification, decision fatigue created by myriad options, and continuous peer-to-peer comparisons are a result of this brave new world of hyperconnection. So how can we reap the benefits and minimize the fallout? Brooks and Lasser provide strategies on three levels: green for prevention (getting kids plugged into activities such as Girl Scouts, community service, and team sports; keeping screens out of bedrooms, setting time limits, and mindfully engaging), yellow for addressing emerging concerns (using collaboration and consequences to minimize challenges), and the red-light level, which calls for strong intervention when necessary. -VERDICT A key title for libraries, with relevant research that supports a balanced approach to technology use. © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
1 Introductionp. 1
2 Technology in Our Livesp. 19
3 Is Our Technology Making Us Any Happier?p. 35
4 The Pull of Our Screensp. 57
5 The Effects of Technology on Children and Familiesp. 81
6 Foundations of the Relationshipp. 103
7 Building the Relationshipp. 113
8 The Green Light Level: Preventionp. 129
9 The Yellow Light Level: Addressing Emerging Concernsp. 161
10 The Red Light Level: When Strong Intervention Is Necessaryp. 179
11 Parenting, Technology, and Schoolingp. 201
12 Summaryp. 219
Appendix 1 Family Assessment Of Screen Time (Fast)p. 237
Appendix 2 Quick-Reference Guide To Strategies For A Tech Happy Lifep. 241
Appendix 3 Faqs For A Tech Happy Lifep. 249
Appendix 4 Tech Happy Life: Resourcesp. 269
Notesp. 271
Indexp. 307