Cover image for In search of lost time [compact disc] / Partner.
Title:
In search of lost time [compact disc] / Partner.
Publication Information:
Toronto, ON : You've Changed Records, [2017]
Physical Description:
1 audio disc : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Title from container.

Compact disc.
Performers/Actors:
Contents:
Everybody knows -- Hey, partner here (skit) -- Comfort zone -- Gross secret -- Callin' Colin (skit) -- Angels from Ontario -- Daytime TV -- You've changed (skit) -- Sex object -- Jośees dad (skit) -- Ambassador to ecstasy -- The world needs a good band (skit) -- Play the field -- You don't have to say thank you -- Piss pants tampon (skit) -- Creature in the sun -- Remember this -- Woman of dreams -- The last word (skit).
Corporate Author:
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GEN PAR Music CD Adult Music CD
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Summary

Summary

In Search of Lost Time is the full-length debut from Partner, a band led by Josée Caro and Lucy Niles, who share the singing and songwriting load. The pair played in a few punk and hardcore groups as students at Mount Allison University in New Brunswick before forming the more upbeat, '90s pop-punk-inspired Partner in 2014. After relocating to Windsor, Ontario in early 2016, they quickly drew attention for spirited live shows and a series of singles that were candid about topics like drugs and sexuality from the perspective of social misfits and self-described queers. (Early single "The Ellen Page" about being compared to the actress, isn't included here but is worth tracking down.) Arriving in 2017, their debut is a 19-track set peppered with short "skits" between song titles like "Gross Secret," "Play the Field," and "Daytime TV." Opening with feedback before settling into emphatic, Weezer-like guitar hooks that permeate the whole album, first track "Everybody Knows" gets things rolling, rhyming "chips" with "bong hits" and "reflection" with "dairy section" before closing with an impressively hammy guitar solo. While the record, in general, lands firmly in the realm of youthful slackerdom, it addresses more embarrassing personal subjects and the relatable everyday with the same light-hearted irreverence. At a glance, the skits may seem extraneous, but they serve to reinforce the notion that everything's cool and we're just hanging out with friends. "The Last Word (Skit)" fittingly wraps up In Search of Lost Time by making the argument that rock & roll is "not going anywhere any time soon." ~ Marcy Donelson