Cover image for Lady Death : the memoirs of Stalin's sniper / Lyudmila Pavlichenko ; foreword by Martin Pegler ; translated by David Foreman ; edited by Alla Igorevna Begunova.
Title:
Lady Death : the memoirs of Stalin's sniper / Lyudmila Pavlichenko ; foreword by Martin Pegler ; translated by David Foreman ; edited by Alla Igorevna Begunova.
ISBN:
9781784382704
Publication Information:
Barnsley, S. Yorkshire : Greenhill Books, 2018.

©2018
Physical Description:
xvii, 252 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, portraits ; 24 cm.
General Note:
"First published by Veche Publishers (Moscow) in 2015 as 'I - sniper : in battles for Sevastopol and Odessa'"--Title page verso.
Contents:
Factory walls -- If there is a war -- From the Prut to the Dnyestr -- Frontiers of fire -- The battle at Tatarka -- Across the sea -- Legendary Sevastopol -- Forest trails -- The second assault -- Duel -- On No-Name Height -- The spring of 1942 -- A word from the Army Commander -- Moscow stars -- Mission to Washington -- My darling -- Island in the ocean -- 'Comrade Stalin has ordered us . . .' -- I am sidelined!
Abstract:
"In June 1941, when Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa, she left her university studies, ignored the offer of a position as a nurse, to become one of Soviet Russia's 2000 female snipers. Less than a year later she had 309 recorded kills, including 29 enemy sniper kills. She was withdrawn from active duty after being injured. She was also regarded as a key heroic figure for the war effort. She spoke at rallies in Canada and the US and the folk singer Woody Guthrie wrote a song, 'Killed By A Gun' about her exploits. Her US trip included a tour of the White House with FDR. In November 1942 she visited Coventry and accepted donations of £4,516 from Coventry workers to pay for three X-ray units for the Red Army. She also visited a Birmingham factory as part of her fundraising tour."--Amazon.com.
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Summary

Summary

The wartime memoir of Lyudmila Pavlichenko is a remarkable document: the publication of an English language edition is a significant coup. Pavlichenko was World War II's best scoring sniper and had a varied wartime career that included trips to England and America.

In June 1941, when Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa, she left her university studies, ignored the offer of a position as a nurse, to become one of Soviet Russia's 2000 female snipers.

Less than a year later she had 309 recorded kills, including 29 enemy sniper kills. She was withdrawn from active duty after being injured. She was also regarded as a key heroic figure for the war effort.

She spoke at rallies in Canada and the US and the folk singer Woody Guthrie wrote a song, 'Killed By A Gun' about her exploits. Her US trip included a tour of the White House with FDR. In November 1942 she visited Coventry and accepted donations of £4,516 from Coventry workers to pay for three X-ray units for the Red Army. She also visited a Birmingham factory as part of her fundraising tour.

She never returned to combat but trained other snipers. After the war, she finished her education at Kiev University and began a career as a historian. She died on October 10, 1974 at age 58, and was buried in Moscow's Novodevichy Cemetery.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

This translation of the memoirs of Lyudmila Pavlichenko, the foremost female sniper in the Soviet Red Army in World War II, brings a gimlet-eyed, accomplished, and appealing figure to English-language readers. Pavlichenko fought in the early years of WWII, primarily in Ukraine and Crimea. She was the most proficient of the Red Army's more than 2,000 female snipers, with 309 confirmed kills to her name. She was highly decorated and promoted, led her own combat platoon of male snipers, and, after a tour of the U.S. and Great Britain, served as a sniper instructor during the war's latter years. Pavlichenko was a trained professional historian, which is reflected in the clarity of her prose and the accuracy of her descriptions. She was also an exceptional shooter; her understanding of the technology of weapons and shooting techniques is evident throughout. Finally, Pavlichenko was a young woman leading male soldiers during one of the most brutal wars in history, and her story can inform an understanding of women's performance in combat. This illuminating memoir will interest readers seeking insights into the Soviet soldier experience, the U.S.S.R.'s relationships with its allies, and the role of women in Soviet Russia and its military-and even readers uninterested in those topics will enjoy spending time in Pavlichenko's company. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Table of Contents

Martin Pegler
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Forewordp. ix
Note to this Editionp. xiv
Russian Editor's Notep. xv
1 Factory Wallsp. 1
2 If There is a Warp. 10
3 From the Prut to the Dnyestrp. 19
4 Frontiers of Firep. 31
5 The Battle at Tatarkap. 53
6 Across the Seap. 63
7 Legendary Sevastopolp. 73
8 Forest Trailsp. 86
9 The Second Assaultp. 103
10 Duelp. 116
11 On No-Name Heightp. 131
12 The Spring of 1942p. 140
13 A Word from the Army Commanderp. 156
14 Moscow Starsp. 165
15 Mission to Washingtonp. 180
16 My Darlingp. 195
17 Island in the Oceanp. 213
18 'Comrade Stalin has Ordered Us ...'p. 227
19 I Am Sidelined!p. 236
Notesp. 247