Cover image for Flights and falls / R.M. Greenaway.
Title:
Flights and falls / R.M. Greenaway.
ISBN:
9781459741508
Publication Information:
Toronto : Dundurn, 2019.

©2019
Physical Description:
382 pages ; 21 cm
Abstract:
"Late at night in December, along the treacherous Sea-to-Sky highway, a red Chevette crashes into the woods. There is one casualty: a young woman. Then, two passersby who had assisted the victim are ruthlessly attacked. Only one survives, and passes on a bizarre clue that sets in motion an investigation into what appears to be an unspeakable game of thrills. While Leith pores over past incidents along the stretch of highway to zero in on the faceless menace, Dion begins to suspect the team is on the wrong track - and that a crime from his past may hold the key to this deadly mystery."-- Provided by publisher.
Holds:
Copies:

Available:*

Copy
Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
1
Searching...
GRE Book Adult Mystery / Suspense Fiction
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Book four of the B.C. Blues crime series starring sleuths Dion and Leith solving murders and twisted cases in the Pacific Northwest. An apparent traffic accident turns into a homicidal game, and a crime in Dion's past may be wrapped up in the plot Booklist "A series to watch," Kirkus " Greenaway brings a keen understanding of love, loyalty, frailty, and greed," Toronto Star "More good things ahead."


Author Notes

R.M. Greenaway has worked in probation and travelled British Columbia as a court reporter. Her first novel in the B.C. Blues Crime series, Cold Girl , won the Unhanged Arthur Ellis Award. She lives in Nelson, B.C.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter 1: Tony November 26 Constable Ken Poole wasn't at his station, andhis desk was a mess. File folders in a slithering heap,Post-it memos stuck to other Post-it memos, a half-emptybag of nachos. Pens and bull-clips, and to top it off,a caped action figurine of some kind overlooked it all,hands on hips. Still no sign of Poole. Dion's eyes wandered from theaction figure to the file folders, to the label on the topmostfolder. It read, "Tony Souza." Souza was the mystery on everybody's mind thesedays. Young, handsome, healthy, a new recruit on theNorth Shore and on the job for less than a month beforetaking sudden leave, right off the rail of a high bridge.Dion had been shocked by the news, and like everybodyelse, he wondered why the man had done it. Jumped. Back at his own neat desk, he dropped into his chairand tried to work. He couldn't recall ever meetingSouza, and only knew his face from the photographsin the paper. Maybe he had seen the man in passing, ahello in the hall? Curiosity drove him back to Poole's desk. Using hisknuckle, as if a light touch made the act less culpable, helifted the folder's manila cover, just to see, and clippedto the front leaf was a photocopy of Souza's last words.One short paragraph. Don't worry about me. I have gone to a better place,it started. At yesterday's service, snatches of conversation hadtold Dion more about Souza than the eulogies did.Souza had broken from his family's strict religious tradition,had shrugged off heaven and hell, simply wasn't achurch-going guy. Dion read the rest of the note, and saw it containedanger: To mom and dad and Sonny, I'm sorry. To everybodyelse, I'm not. Sonny was Sonia, Tony's sister. Shehad spoken at the service, saying her brother was muchloved and would be missed. If she had any idea whyTony had ended his life, she hadn't shared that knowledge.Nobody had. Neither did anybody ask Dion to care -- but howcould he not? Death by suicide was always tragic. It wasthe crime that so oft en went unsolved. It was worrisome,too. What if the person had stepped into oblivionbecause they had stumbled upon the fundamental,bottom-line truth about the meaning of life, like a messagein a bottle, and that truth was too awful to bear? He shrugged. As pointless as it might be, he would goover the note in his mind for a while, as he lay in bed orate breakfast or warmed up his car, trying to understandits incongruities. If Souza had found God, as the "betterplace" suggested, the discovery had not done much forhim. The proof was in the fall. Souza blamed everybodybut his immediate family for his unbearable pain, butDion suspected that the everybody could be narroweddown to a somebody . Still, Souza was not his brother, not his case, andnone of his business, and his death would not haunthim for long. In these moments of pondering, though,he had to wonder if the new recruit blamed the force forhis troubles. He wouldn't be surprised. Excerpted from Flights and Falls: A B. C. Blues Crime Novel by R. M. Greenaway All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.