Cover image for Weather or not / by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle and Emily Jenkins.
Title:
Weather or not / by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle and Emily Jenkins.
ISBN:
9781338221473
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, [2018]

©2018
Physical Description:
181 pages ; 22 cm.
Abstract:
When Willa's upside-down magic rains, it pours. Clouds form under ceilings. Classrooms get flooded. Umbrellas must always be nearby, just in case Willa has an outburst. Willa hates being the source of such sogginess. Even worse, the more she rains, the badder she feels ... and the badder she feels, the more she rains. All the storminess is threatening to drown her good grades and flood all her friendships. Is there any way to use magic to make the clouds disappear? Or is the storm of the century on its way?-- Amazon.
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Summary

Summary

Get ready for more magical hijinks in the fifth book of this hilarious series!

When Willa's upside-down magic rains, it pours. Clouds form under ceilings. Classrooms get flooded. Umbrellas must always be nearby, just in case Willa has an outburst.

Willa hates being the source of such sogginess. Even worse, the more she rains, the badder she feels . . . and the badder she feels, the more she rains.

All the storminess is threatening to drown her good grades and flood all her friendships. Is there any way to use magic to make the clouds disappear? Or is the storm of the century on its way?


Author Notes

Sarah Mlynowski was born on January 4, 1977 in Montreal, Canada. She attended McGill University where she graduated with a degree in English Literature. She later moved to Toronto to work for Harlequin Enterprises Ltd. She used her romance publishing experiences to fuel her first novel Milkrun. She now writes full-time and her other works include Fishbowl, Monkey Business, Me Vs. Me, and Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn't Have). She also writes the Magic in Manhattan series. Her title's, Bad Hair Day and Beauty Queen made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

The writers behind How to Be Bad (2008) aim for a younger audience in this entertaining story about magical powers gone humorously awry. Ten-year-old Nory is mortified when she bungles her interview at the posh magical academy where her father is headmaster; attempting to morph into a kitten, she instead turns into a sequence of outrageous hybrid animals, including a "dritten" (dragon-kitten). She is shipped off to live with her wonderfully kooky Aunt Margo (who works as a flying taxi, zipping passengers around on her back) and enrolls in an "Upside-Down Magic" program. Nory's fear that her classmates will be "the worst of the wonky" is delightfully realized. Magical shenanigans abound as the story celebrates individuality, self-acceptance, and tolerance, encapsulated in Aunt Margo's advice: "Just be who you are, not who you think you should be." Featuring short chapters and lively, funny dialogue, this novel should please kids who don't naturally find reading to be magical, as well as those who do. Ages 8-12. Agent: (for Mlynowski) Laura Dail, Laura Dail Literary Agency; (for Myracle) Barry Goldblatt, Barry Goldblatt Literary; (for Jenkins) Elizabeth Kaplan, Elizabeth Kaplan Agency. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Norys older brother is a Flare (manipulates fire); her older sister is a Fuzzy (controls animals); and their father, a Flicker (turns things invisible), is headmaster of the prestigious Sage Academy of Magic and Performance. Norys own magic is wonky, most closely approximating a messed-up Fluxer (shape-shifting): she can turn herself into a kitten easily enough, but a) shes spotty about subsequently keeping control over the feline part of her brain; and b) she frequently turns into two animals at oncea beaver-kitten, for example. After a disastrous showing at her Sage Academy entrance exam, Dad sends her to live with eccentric Aunt Margo to attend a school that offers a special program for the worst of the wonky, as Nory puts it. And her classmates are doozies: one boy sees sound waves, another turns into a rock. Their teacher, Ms. Starr, takes a holistic approach, having the children do headstands and trust exercises and exploring the connections between their powers and their emotions. In this collaboration among three authors, theres no telling who did what, in a good way: the writing is seamless. The book is light but not inconsequential, and its multicultural and differently-abled castNorys dad is black and her mom (who died a long time ago) was white; a new friend is Asian American; their school principal is Hispanic; a classmate wears a hearing aidwill be welcomed by a broad audience. elissa gershowitz (c) Copyright 2015. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Excerpt from Upside Down Magic

Nory Horace was trying to turn herself into a kitten.

The kitten had to be a black kitten. And it had to be completely kitten-shaped.

It was the middle of summer. Nory was hiding in her family's garage. Kitten, kitten, kitten, she thought.

She was hiding in case something went wrong. She didn't want anyone to see. Still, if something went really wrong, her brother and sister would be close enough to hear her yell for help.

Or meow for help.

Or roar.

Nory decided not to think about that. Hopefully, she wouldn't need help.

Kitten, kitten, kitten.

She had to master kitten, because tomorrow was the Big Test. Tomorrow, after so many years of waiting, she would finally take the entrance exam for Sage Academy.

The school was very hard to get into. You wouldn't be accepted with anything less than amazing talents. Nory's friends weren't even bothering to try. They were all taking tests for easier schools.

If Nory passed the Big Test, she would start fifth grade at Sage Academy in the fall.

If she failed the test . . .

No. She couldn't fail. She wasn't taking tests for any other schools.

Excerpted from Upside-Down Magic by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle, Emily Jenkins All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.