Cover image for The burglar : a novel / Thomas Perry.
Title:
The burglar : a novel / Thomas Perry.
ISBN:
9780802129000
Edition:
First edition, First Grove Atlantic hardcover edition.
Publication Information:
New York : The Mysterious Press, 2019.
Physical Description:
288 pages ; 24 cm
Abstract:
"From the New York Times bestselling author Thomas Perry, "who can be depended upon to deliver high-voltage shocks" (Stephen King), comes a nail-biting race against death as a young burglar realizes she must solve a string of murders, or else become the next victim Elle Stowell is a young woman with an unconventional profession: burglary. But Elle is no petty thief--with just the right combination of smarts, looks, and skills, she can easily stroll through ritzy Bel Air neighborhoods and pick out the perfect home for plucking the most valuable items. This is how Elle has always gotten by. She is good at it, and she thrives on the thrill. But after stumbling upon a grisly triple homicide while stealing from the home of a wealthy art dealer, Elle discoversthat she is no longer the only one sneaking around. Somebody is searching for her. As Elle realizes that her knowledge of the murder has made her a target, she races to solve the case before becoming the next casualty, using her breaking-and-entering skills to uncover the truth about exactly who the victims were and why someone might have wanted them dead. With high-stakes action and shocking revelations, The Burglar will keep readers on the edge of their seats as they barrel towards the heart-racing conclusion" -- Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

From the New York Times bestselling author Thomas Perry, "who can be depended upon to deliver high-voltage shocks" (Stephen King), comes a new thriller about an unlikely burglar--a young woman in her 20s--who realizes she must solve a string of murders, or else become the next victim

Elle Stowell is a young woman with an unconventional profession: burglary. But Elle is no petty thief--with just the right combination of smarts, looks, and skills, she can easily stroll through ritzy Bel Air neighborhoods and pick out the perfect home for plucking the most valuable items. This is how Elle has always gotten by--she is good at it, and she thrives on the thrill. But after stumbling upon a grisly triple homicide while stealing from the home of a wealthy art dealer, Elle discovers that she is no longer the only one sneaking around. Somebody is searching for her.

As Elle realizes that her knowledge of the high-profile murder has made her a target, she races to solve the case before becoming the next casualty, using her breaking-and-entering skills to uncover the truth about exactly who the victims were and why someone might have wanted them dead. With high-stakes action and shocking revelations, The Burglar will keep readers on the edge of their seats as they barrel towards the heart-racing conclusion.


Author Notes

Thomas Perry is the bestselling author of over twenty novels, including the critically acclaimed Jane Whitefield series, Forty Thieves , and The Butcher's Boy , which won the Edgar Award. He lives in Southern California.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Burglar Elle Stowell, the whip-smart, fearless protagonist of this uneven standalone from Edgar winner Perry (The Bomb Maker), comes from a family of thieves. She approaches every job analytically and is meticulous in her planning. But when she breaks into an L.A. mansion and finds three dead bodies-one male art gallery owner and two affluent married women-naked on a bed in the master bedroom, she becomes the target of a group of professional killers. As the killers' search for her intensifies and the body count rises, the diminutive burglar must uncover the reason why the gallery owner and women were murdered before she becomes the next casualty. The first part of this tight narrative, which is equal parts mystery and thriller, is virtually un-put-downable. But the story starts to unravel in the second part, when numerous plot holes become apparent. In addition, the weak ending will leave readers less than satisfied. Perry fans will hope for a return to form next time. Agent: Mel Berger, WME. (Jan.) c Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


New York Review of Books Review

TROUBLE COMES CALLING ?? the Louisiana bayou parish where James Lee Burke sets his idiosyncratic regional novels. In THE NEW IBERIA BLUES (Simon & Schuster, $27.99), a condemned murderer named Hugo Tillinger has pulled off a daring escape from a Texas prison and is now hiding somewhere in his old neighborhood. Another recent arrival, the Hollywood director Desmond Cormier, has returned to his humble native roots to make a movie, installing himself and his entourage in a swell house with a spectacular view of the bay. From that vantage, Dave Robicheaux, the broody sheriff's deputy who has stamped his forceful personality on this series, lays eyes on yet another visitor - a woman nailed to a large wooden cross that washes up from the bay. The dead woman, the daughter of a local minister, volunteered for the Innocence Project and was working to free Tillinger from prison. But while there seems to have been a real connection between the minister's daughter and the escaped prisoner, Burke must exert himself to fit those Hollywood types into his brutal byzantine plot. (I stopped counting after the 10 th violent death.) But does anyone really read Burke expecting a coherent narrative? We're hanging on for Robicheaux's pensées, like his meditation on the living spirits of the dead: "I don't believe that time is sequential. I believe the world belongs to the dead as well as the unborn." We're keeping an eye out for vivid characters like Bella Delahoussaye, a blues singer with intimate knowledge of Big Mama Thornton's mournful "Ball and Chain." Maybe most of all, we're waiting for those angry outbursts when Robicheaux lets it rip: "I don't think you get it," he tells one of the movie people. "Louisiana is America's answer to Guatemala. Our legal system is a joke. Our legislature is a mental asylum. How'd you like to spend a few days in our parish prison?" Only if there's a new James Lee Burke novel in the cell. "there was esoteric knowledge involved in being a burglar," Thomas Perry advises us in THE BURGLAR (Mysterious Press, $26). It takes considerable expertise to select the right house, break in without waking the dog and recognize what's worth stealing. Elle Stowell has been at this profession since she was 15, but this petite, lithe young pro isn't prepared to find three people - all naked and shot between the eyes - piled in a heap on the king-size bed in the master suite of the house in Bel-Air she's broken into. The protagonists of Perry's ingenious thrillers are usually skilled at devising schemes for getting out of awkward situations. Elle uses her wits to break into tight spots, like the headquarters of the shady security firm hunting her down for involving herself in the triple homicide. Elle performs tricky feats here, but her pieces de resistance are the elaborate strategies she engineers to break into that company's control center. If Perry is the king of obsessive strategists (and I so declare him), Elle is his pinup model. the thing is, Serge A. Storms is nuts; nonetheless, that doesn't stop Tim Dorsey's psycho hero from doing great deeds. While gripped in his never-ending quest to write an oral history of his beloved Florida, Serge manages to violently dispatch profiteers who menace the innocent and unwary. NO SUNSCREEN FOR THE DEAD (Morrow/HarperCollins, $26.99) finds Serge on a mission to rescue retirees from the hucksters who prey on them. "They have absolutely no soul," he rages, after viewing one gullible couple's junk-filled home. "They will sell and sell and sell until you either lose your house or call the cops." With Coleman, his perpetually stoned companion at his side, Serge storms into Boca Shores, a retirement community of nice people who need his help. After snuffing out an abusive caretaker, he's honored with a raucous pool party, a tribute he repays by treating everyone to a rollicking road trip we'd love to sign up for. AUGUST OCTAVIO snow is a big Detroit booster. In LIVES LAID AWAY (Soho Crime, $26.95), Stephen Mack Jones picks up his gung-ho protagonist where the author left him in his first novel, "August Snow" - cleaning up his beat-up neighborhood in Mexicantown. Using the millions awarded from his successful case against the Police Department, this ex-cop has already rescued his childhood home and is now renovating the other houses on his street. Snow thinks his old job is safely behind him - until a girl in a Marie Antoinette costume is tossed off the Ambassador Bridge. The victim is 19-year-old Isadora (Izzy) Rosalita del Torres, an undocumented worker who went missing in a government raid, and her battered body indicates she was being exploited by sex traffickers. Snow swings into action-hero mode and recruits a posse of friends and neighbors for a vigilante mission that dovetails with his crusade against ICE raids. Seeing Detroit through Snow's adoring eyes is sweet. But except for the bad guys, who go out in a blazing gun battle, the characters are too good to be true, from Snow's sainted godmother and a priest who operates an underground railroad to Snow himself, who could use a few flaws to make him human. Marilyn STASIO has covered crime fiction for the Book Review since 1988. Her column appears twice a month.


Excerpts

Excerpts

There was esoteric knowledge to being a burglar--broad areas that took some thought and skill. There was choosing the house, entering the house, and finding the items that were worth taking. Elle Stowell was good at all three. Elle was strong but small, so she couldn't carry a seven-foot television out of a house if she'd wanted to. It didn't matter because the real prizes were all small and dense--money, watches, jewelry, gold, guns, and collections--and usually they were to be found in or near the master bedroom suite. Some of the things she found in bedroom hiding places that fit this description were revealing but not for her to take: secret cell phones for calling lovers, second sets of identification, bugout kits, or drugs. Her small size helped her. She looked like a person who would be out running at dawn in a rich neighborhood, so she didn't worry people who saw her. There was a certain irony to this, because the same qualities made her a fearsome burglar. She could enter a house in dozens of ways that were impos-sible for a large man. She could easily crawl into a house through a dog door or take the glass slats out of a louvered window and slither inside. Both openings were common and neither was ever wired for an alarm. Excerpted from The Burglar by Thomas Perry All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.