Cover image for Stella Díaz has something to say / Angela Dominguez.
Title:
Stella Díaz has something to say / Angela Dominguez.
ISBN:
9781250294104
Edition:
First Square Fish edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Square Fish, an imprint of Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC, 2019.

©2018.
Physical Description:
202 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.
General Note:
Originally published by Roaring Brook Press, 2018.
Abstract:
Stella Diaz loves marine animals, especially her betta fish, Pancho. But Stella Diaz is not a betta fish. Betta fish like to be alone, while Stella loves spending time with her mom and brother and her best friend Jenny. Trouble is, Jenny is in another class this year, and Stella feels very lonely.When a new boy arrives in Stella's class, she really wants to be his friend, but sometimes Stella accidentally speaks Spanish instead of English and pronounces words wrong, which makes her turn roja. Plus, she has to speak in front of her whole class for a big presentation at school! But she better get over her fears soon, because Stella Díaz has something to say!Stella Díaz Has Something to Say introduces an infectiously charming new character with relatable writing and adorable black-and-white art throughout. Simple Spanish vocabulary is also integrated within the text, providing a bilingual element.
Audience/Reading Level:
Interest age level: 6-9.
Holds:
Copies:

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Summary

Summary

In her first middle-grade novel, award-winning picture book author and illustrator Angela Dominguez tells a heartwarming story based on her own experiences growing up Mexican-American.

Stella Diaz loves marine animals, especially her betta fish, Pancho. But Stella Diaz is not a betta fish. Betta fish like to be alone, while Stella loves spending time with her mom and brother and her best friend Jenny. Trouble is, Jenny is in another class this year, and Stella feels very lonely.

When a new boy arrives in Stella's class, she really wants to be his friend, but sometimes Stella accidentally speaks Spanish instead of English and pronounces words wrong, which makes her turn roja . Plus, she has to speak in front of her whole class for a big presentation at school! But she better get over her fears soon, because Stella Díaz has something to say!

Stella Díaz Has Something to Say introduces an infectiously charming new character with relatable writing and adorable black-and-white art throughout. Simple Spanish vocabulary is also integrated within the text, providing a bilingual element.

Praise for Stella Diaz Has Something to Say

"Readers will cheer as they see how, with the help of her friends and family, Stella overcomes her shyness . . . A nice and timely depiction of an immigrant child experience." -- Kirkus Reviews

" Realistic relationships ground this character-driven story . . . Fans of Clementine and Alvin Ho will be delighted to meet Stella." -- School Library Journal, starred review


Author Notes

Angela Dominguez was born in Mexico City, grew up in the great state of Texas, and now resides on the east coast. She is the author and illustrator of several books for children including Maria Had a Little Llama , which received the American Library Association Pura Belpré Illustration Honor. Recently, she received her second Pura Belpré Honor for her illustrations in Mango, Abuela, and Me written by Meg Medina. When Angela is not in her studio, she teaches at the Academy of Art University, which honored her with their Distinguished Alumni Award in 2013. She also enjoys presenting at different schools and libraries to all sorts of ages. Angela is a proud member of SCBWI, PEN America, and represented by Wernick and Pratt Literary Agency. As a child, she loved reading books and making a mess creating pictures. She's delighted to still be doing both.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Picture book author-illustrator Dominguez (Sing, Don't Cry) moves into middle grade with the story of Stella Díaz, whose family moved to Chicago from Mexico City when she was a baby. Now in third grade, Stella doesn't always feel like she belongs, especially after she learns more about her resident status at school ("because of this green card, I'm an alien?"). Stella goes to speech therapy class to learn "how all the letters and words are supposed to sound in English," but she finds it hard to speak up, especially when new student Stanley arrives in school. Stanley is complimentary of Stella's artwork (one of her two passions, along with fish), but Stella feels extra shy around him. Drawing on her own childhood, Dominguez smoothly blends Spanish and English into the narration and dialogue, Stella's Mexican-American culture fully informs her perspective and family life, and chunky spot art helps establish the setting. Readers should easily relate to Stella, her struggle to use her voice, and the way she feels caught between worlds at school and at home. Ages 6-9. Agent: Linda Pratt, Wernick & Pratt. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Shy, artistic third grader Stella Daz sometimes struggles to express her thoughts aloud, feeling self-conscious about her accent and occasionally using a Spanish word when she means to use English. Stella, who emigrated from Mexico to Chicago when she was a baby, is worried about being in a different class than her Vietnamese American best friend, Jenny. But a new student is arriving, and Stella hopes shell make a friend. When that student turns out to be a confident boy named Stanley, Stellas anxiety threatens to derail her. With the help of her beloved mother, her mostly wonderful older brother, her supportive teachers, and (occasionally) her primarily absent father, Stella manages to build self-confidence. Stellas cross-cultural experiences, such as taking speech classes to refine her American accent, questioning what it means to be a green cardholder, and feeling not-Mexican-enough for her grandparents, may spark discussions about contemporary immigration. Told in Stellas voice, the story sometimes sounds like a middle-grade novel and other times a book for a much younger audience, but many readers will relate to and sympathize with the protagonist. Lively interspersed black-and-white illustrations showing elements of Stellas day-to-day life and of her imagination add dimension to a rich narrative. christina l. dobbs (c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.