Cover image for No surrender : the land remains indigenous / Sheldon Krasowski ; foreword by Winona Wheeler.
Title:
No surrender : the land remains indigenous / Sheldon Krasowski ; foreword by Winona Wheeler.
ISBN:
9780889775961
Publication Information:
Regina, Saskatchewan : University of Regina Press, 2019.

©2019
Physical Description:
xviii, 368 pages : illustrations, map, portraits ; 23 cm
Abstract:
"Between 1869 and 1877 the government of Canada negotiated Treaties One through Seven with the Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains. Many historians argue that the negotiations suffered from cultural misunderstandings between the treaty commissioners and Indigenous chiefs, but newly uncovered eyewitness accounts show that the Canadian government had a strategic plan to deceive over the "surrender clause" and land sharing. According to Sheldon Krasowski's research, Canada understood that the Cree, Anishnabeg, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, Siksika, Piikani, Kainaa, Stoney and Tsuu T'ina nations wanted to share the land with newcomers--with conditions--but were misled over governance, reserved lands, and resource sharing. Exposing the government chicanery at the heart of the negotiations, No Surrender demonstrates that the land remains Indigenous."-- Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

Between 1869 and 1877 the government of Canada negotiated Treaties One through Seven with the Indigenous peoples of the Great Plains. Many historians argue that the negotiations suffered from cultural misunderstandings between the treaty commissioners and Indigenous chiefs, but newly uncovered eyewitness accounts show that the Canadian government had a strategic plan to deceive over the "surrender clause" and land sharing. According to Sheldon Krasowski's research, Canada understood that the Cree, Anishnabeg, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, Siksika, Piikani, Kainaa, Stoney and Tsuu T'ina nations wanted to share the land with newcomers--with conditions--but were misled over governance, reserved lands, and resource sharing. Exposing the government chicanery at the heart of the negotiations, No Surrender demonstrates that the land remains Indigenous.


Table of Contents

Winona Wheeler
List of Maps and Figuresp. IX
Forewordp. XI
Preface and Acknowledgementsp. XV
Introduction: The Numbered Treaties in Historical Context: "Our Dream Is That One Day Our Peoples Will Be Clearly Recognized as Nations"p. 1
Chapter 1 Treaties One and Two and the Outside Promises: "The Loyalty Which Costs Nothing Is Worth Nothing"p. 39
Chapter 2 Treaty Three: The North-West Angle Treaty: "I Take Off My Glove to Give You My Hand to Sign the Treaty"p. 87
Chapter 3 Treaties Four and Five: The Fort Qu'Appelle and Lake Winnipeg Treaties, 1874 and 1875: "The Treaties Should Be Canadas Magna Carta"p. 129
Chapter 4 Treaty Six: The Treaty of Forts Carlton and Pitt: I Want to Hold the Treaty We Made with the Queen"p. 175
Chapter 5 Treaty Seven: The Blackfoot Crossing Treaty: "The Great Spirit and Not the Great Mother Gave Us This Land"p. 235
Conclusion: As Long as the Sun Shines: "An Everlasting Grasp of Her [the Queen's] Hand"p. 271
Notesp. 279
Selected Bibliographyp. 317
Indexp. 333