Cover image for Won Ton and Chopstick : a cat and dog tale told in haiku / Lee Wardlaw ; illustrated by Eugene Yelchin.
Title:
Won Ton and Chopstick : a cat and dog tale told in haiku / Lee Wardlaw ; illustrated by Eugene Yelchin.
ISBN:
9780805099874
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Henry Holt and Company, 2015.

©2015
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : colour illustrations ; 29 cm
General Note:
Sequel to: Won Ton, a cat tale told in haiku.
Abstract:
Won Ton and his boy are enjoying a fine life until "Doom" arrives--a dog that is smelly and steals his dinner, but soon the disgruntled cat learns that his new family member might have some good points, too.
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Summary

Summary

Won Ton has a happy life with his Boy, until...

Ears perk. Fur prickles.
Belly low, I creep...peek...FREEZE!
My eyes full of Doom.

A new puppy arrives, and nothing will be the same.
Told entirely in haiku and with plenty of catitude, the story of how Won Ton faces down the enemy is a fresh and funny twist on a familiar rivalry.

NCTE Notable Poetry List Book


Author Notes

Lee Wardlaw has published nearly thirty award-winning books for young readers, including Won Ton: A Cat Tale Told in Haiku and Red, White, and Boom! She lives in Santa Barbara, California, with her family.
Eugene Yelchin is the illustrator of Won Ton: A Cat Tale Told in Haiku and the author/illustrator of Breaking Stalin's Nose , which earned him a Newbery Honor in 2012. He is also the author/illustrator of Arcady's Goal . He lives with his family in Topanga, California.


Reviews 1

Horn Book Review

In this sequel to Won Ton: A Cat Tale Told in Haiku (rev. 3/11), the cautious kitty has another reason to be worried: an adorable new puppy. Won Ton is not happy when he catches his first glimpse: "Ears perk. Fur prickles. / Belly low, I creeppeekFREEZE! / My eyes full of Doom." He scoffs at the ideas the people suggest for names, and ferociously warns the new pup: "Trespassers bitten." Yelchin's graphite and gouache illustrations depict with sensitivity and humor the sleek gray cat's initial fear and horror alongside the roly-poly brown puppy. Pastel backgrounds cleverly incorporating shadow and light allow the funny poses and expressions of the pair to shine. Each haiku is complete in itself, capturing the essence of cat with images such as the banished and lonesome Won Ton "Q-curled tight," and together the poems create a whole tale of displacement and eventual mutual understanding. At the end, both cat and puppy snuggle in bed with the boy, meeting nose-to-nose as friends. susan dove lempke (c) Copyright 2015. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.