Cover image for The border / Don Winslow.
Title:
The border / Don Winslow.
ISBN:
9780062664488
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2019]
Physical Description:
720 pages : map ; 25 cm.
Abstract:
"The explosive, highly anticipated conclusion to the epic Cartel trilogy from the New York Times bestselling author of The Force. What do you do when there are no borders? When the lines you thought existed simply vanish? How do you plant your feet to make a stand when you no longer know what side you're on? The war has come home. For over forty years, Art Keller has been on the front lines of America's longest conflict: The War On Drugs. His obsession to defeat the world's most powerful, wealthy, and lethal kingpin--the godfather of the Sinaloa Cartel, Adan Barrera--has left him bloody and scarred, cost him people he loves, even taken a piece of his soul. Now Keller is elevated to the highest ranks of the DEA, only to find that in destroying one monster he has created thirty more that are wreaking even more chaos and suffering in his beloved Mexico. But not just there. Barrera's final legacy is the heroin epidemic scourging America. Throwing himself into the gap to stem the deadly flow, Keller finds himself surrounded by enemies--men that want to kill him, politicians that want to destroy him, and worse, the unimaginable--an incoming administration that's in bed with the very drug traffickers that Keller is trying to bring down. Art Keller is at war with not only the cartels, but with his own government. And the long fight has taught him more than he ever imagined. Now, he learns the final lesson--there are no borders. In a story that moves from deserts south of the border to Wall Street, from the slums of Guatemala to the marbled corridors of Washington, D.C., Winslow follows a new generation ofnarcos, the cops that fight them, the street traffickers, the addicts, the politicians, money-launderers, real-estate moguls and mere children fleeing the violence for the chance of a life in a new country. A shattering tale of vengeance, violence, corruption and justice, this last novel in Don Winslow's magnificent, award-winning, internationally bestselling trilogy is packed with unforgettable, drawn-from-the-headlines scenes. Shocking in its brutality, raw in its humanity, Untitledis an unflinchingportrait of modern America, a story of--and for--our time"-- Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

ONE OF THE MOST ACCLAIMED BOOKS OF THE YEAR

"A big, sprawling, ultimately stunning crime tableau." - Janet Maslin, New York Times

"You can't ask for more emotionally moving entertainment." - Stephen King

"One of the best thriller writers on the planet." - Esquire

The explosive, highly anticipated conclusion to the epic Cartel trilogy from the New York Times bestselling author of The Force

What do you do when there are no borders? When the lines you thought existed simply vanish? How do you plant your feet to make a stand when you no longer know what side you're on?

The war has come home.

For over forty years, Art Keller has been on the front lines of America's longest conflict: The War on Drugs. His obsession to defeat the world's most powerful, wealthy, and lethal kingpin―the godfather of the Sinaloa Cartel, Adán Barrera―has left him bloody and scarred, cost him the people he loves, even taken a piece of his soul.

Now Keller is elevated to the highest ranks of the DEA, only to find that in destroying one monster he has created thirty more that are wreaking even more chaos and suffering in his beloved Mexico. But not just there.

Barrera's final legacy is the heroin epidemic scourging America. Throwing himself into the gap to stem the deadly flow, Keller finds himself surrounded by enemies―men who want to kill him, politicians who want to destroy him, and worse, the unimaginable―an incoming administration that's in bed with the very drug traffickers that Keller is trying to bring down.

Art Keller is at war with not only the cartels, but with his own government. And the long fight has taught him more than he ever imagined. Now, he learns the final lesson―there are no borders.

In a story that moves from deserts of Mexico to Wall Street, from the slums of Guatemala to the marbled corridors of Washington, D.C., Winslow follows a new generation of narcos, the cops who fight them, street traffickers, addicts, politicians, money-launderers, real-estate moguls, and mere children fleeing the violence for the chance of a life in a new country.

A shattering tale of vengeance, violence, corruption and justice, this last novel in Don Winslow's magnificent, award-winning, internationally bestselling trilogy is packed with unforgettable, drawn-from-the-headlines scenes. Shocking in its brutality, raw in its humanity, The Border is an unflinching portrait of modern America, a story of--and for--our time.


Author Notes

Don Winslow was born in New York City on October 31, 1953. He received a degree in African history from the University of Nebraska. Before becoming a full-time writer, he worked as a movie theater manager, private investigator, safari guide, actor, theater director and consultant. His works include A Cool Breeze on the Underground, The Death and Life of Bobby Z, The Winter of Frankie Machine, Savages, The Kings of Cool, The Cartel, and the Neal Carey Mysteries series. His novel California Fire and Life won the Shamus Award. In 2016, he won the Ian Fleming Steel Dagger for best crime thriller of the year for The Cartel. He has also written for film and television.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

In bestseller Winslow's stunning conclusion to his monumental Cartel trilogy (after 2015's The Cartel), Art Keller, now the head of the DEA, has spent decades waging a relentless campaign against the Mexican drug cartels. It's now late 2012, and Adán Barrera, Keller's longtime nemesis and the leader of the Sinaloa cartel, is missing and presumed dead. Violence soon escalates as the fractured remnants of Barrera's organization struggle against a host of new players vying for control of the drug trade. The bottom has fallen out of the marijuana market, and heroin has once again become the drug of choice for a new generation of Americans hooked on opiate painkillers. When fentanyl, a lethal new synthetic opiate, hits the streets, not only are poor minority users dying but well-to-do white kids are overdosing in record numbers. Keller knows like nobody else that America's "war on drugs" has been a complete failure, and he opts for a daring new clandestine approach: instead of targeting the suppliers in Mexico, he goes after the money in the States. With clear-eyed determination and an almost Shakespearean grasp of human nature, Winslow takes readers on an unforgettable journey. Agent: Shane Salerno, Story Factory. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


New York Review of Books Review

It took 14 years, beginning with The Power of the Dog in 2005, but Don Winslow has finally finished his monumental trilogy about the Mexican drug cartels and, on the other side of the border, the American dealers, fixers and addicts who keep the trade flourishing. THE BORDER (Morrow/ HarperCollins, $28.99) is a mighty book, overflowing with dramatic subplots populated by characters who come and go and are killed off with alarming frequency. In one disturbing sequence, inspired by a real-life atrocity, 43 Mexican students are dragged from their tour buses and immolated. At the other end of this devastating spectrum, a college freshman on Staten Island gets hooked on heroin and prostitutes herself for a fix. A D. E. a. agent named Art Keller is both our guide through this world and an active player in its scenes of unflinching violence - as well as surprising tenderness. Since he emerged from an operation in the jungles of Guatemala in 2012, he has been obsessed with bringing down Adán Barrera, the ruthless fictional godfather Winslow has placed at the head of the real-life Sinaloa drug cartel. With its rival, the Zetas, wiped out, Sinaloa rules the trade. When Barrera falls, caravans of narcos make their way up twisted country roads to pay their respects at his funeral; then they fight to the death to succeed him. Winslow writes like someone who's been to hell and back and can't wait to talk about the experience. He especially wants to make the point, as one Mexican woman puts it, that her government (and, by implication, ours) is not serious about shutting down the drug trade, it's serious about managing the drug trade. Whether good, bad or altogether hopeless, his characters are full of life and hard to forget. Among the most lethal: Ruben Ascensión, called El Cachorro, the Puppy, and Belinda Vatos, adored as a narco rock star. Although Winslow's plot is epic-scaled and intended to raise serious issues about the drug trade as a major American industry, it's those multiple generations of crazy narco families that really make his case. Venetians love to gossip, Donna Leon advises us in unto us a son IS GIVEN (Atlantic Monthly, $26) , her latest mystery featuring that most compassionate of policemen, Guido Brunetti, commissario di polizia. There's bound to be talk when Gonzalo Rodriguez de Tejeda, the rich Spanish godfather of Brunetti's wife, Paola, adopts his lover and makes the young man his legal heir. To the degree that we love Gonzalo, we can be concerned for him, Paola says, but we cannot gossip about him, at least not at this table. To keep peace in the family, Brunetti agrees; but as a devotee of the classics he can't help thinking of Caesar's designated heir, his nephew Octavian, whose accursed lineage handed Rome to the likes of Tiberius, Caligula and Nero. Things turn ugly when Gonzalo unexpectedly dies on a visit to his family in Madrid, and uglier still when his best friend, who has traveled from Yorkshire to Venice for the funeral, is strangled at her hotel. Of course, Brunetti has seen crimes like this before, but this cop is neither jaded nor callous, and he has that rare quality Italians would call un cuore d'oro, a heart of gold. Comic crime capers are fun. Comic crime capers starring women are even more fun. William Boyle delivers some choice laughs and a terrific trio of felons in A FRIEND IS A GIFT YOU GIVE YOURSELF (Pegasus Crime, $25.95) . This jaunty escapade begins in Brooklyn when Rena Ruggiero, the 60-year-old widow of a departed wiseguy, slugs Enzio, her 80-year-old neighbor, for putting the moves on her. Thinking she's killed him, Rena jumps into Enzio's spiffy '62 Chevy Impala and heads for her daughter Adrienne's house in the Bronx. For good reason, Adrienne can't go on the lam, but her 15-year-old daughter, Lucia, thinks grandma is cool. With the addition of an ex-porn star, Lacey Wolfstein, the Chevy is full of adventurous females and good to go on a road trip that's so much fun you don't want it to end. GREG ILES'S books often take place in beleaguered small towns in Mississippi like Bienville, the fictional setting of CEMETERY ROAD (Morrow/HarperCollins, $28.99) . Faithful to formula, his stock characters face unlikely predicaments that are resolved through familiar plot devices. Here it's the murder of an archaeologist who unearths historical artifacts that pose a serious threat to a projected paper mill. But there's something about Bienville that rings true, something about the plight of small towns all over the South struggling to remain relevant in a modern economy. In fiction, if not in life, all they need is a hometown hero like Marshall McEwan to revive them. I'm a good Southern boy at heart, Marshall says, explaining why he has returned to care for his aged father and rescue both the family newspaper and the town itself. The story may be corny, but there's a terrific party scene set in a grand old hotel that luxuriates in one last night of glory. Marilyn STASIO has covered crime fiction for the Book Review since 1988. Her column appears twice a month.


Library Journal Review

Winslow's conclusion to his Cartel trilogy (The Cartel; The Power of the Dog) not only immerses readers in a terrifying world of crime and mistrust, it also showcases a situation that eerily ties in to current headlines. Art Keller has seen and experienced horror in his life, and when he receives a promotion to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), he soon realizes that the battle against the drug cartels in Mexico has financial ties to the U.S. government. A violent and harrowing journey plunges Keller into a scenario from which he might not find justice, and in the middle of it all he discovers that the border is imaginary when it comes to the war on drugs. Winslow mixes poetic prose with the modern crime tale and best fantasy novels to craft a thriller that is more than just a look at the fight to stop drugs from reaching the United States. VERDICT This story couldn't be timelier if Winslow had scheduled it directly with the federal government. It promises to deliver worthy discussions on several topics, making it perfect for a book group selection. [See Prepub Alert, 8/10/18.]-Jeff Ayers, Seattle P.L. © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.