Cover image for Queenie : a novel / Candice Carty-Williams.
Title:
Queenie : a novel / Candice Carty-Williams.
ISBN:
9781501196010

9781501196027
Edition:
First Scout Press hardcover edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scout Press, 2019.

©2019
Physical Description:
330 pages ; 24 cm
Abstract:
Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she's constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places . . . including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth. As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, 'What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?' -- all of the questions today's woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her.
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Summary

Summary

NAMED ONE OF THE MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS OF 2019 BY WOMAN'S DAY , NEWSDAY , PUBLISHERS WEEKLY , BUSTLE , AND BOOK RIOT !

"[B]rilliant, timely, funny, heartbreaking." --Jojo Moyes, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Me Before You

Bridget Jones's Diary meets Americanah in this disarmingly honest, boldly political, and truly inclusive novel that will speak to anyone who has gone looking for love and found something very different in its place.

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she's constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places...including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, "What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?"--all of the questions today's woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her.

With "fresh and honest" (Jojo Moyes) prose, Queenie is a remarkably relatable exploration of what it means to be a modern woman searching for meaning in today's world.


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

Carty-Williams's smart, fearless debut follows Queenie Jenkins, a Jamaican-British woman, after her longtime white boyfriend, Tom, asks for a "break." Queenie's impulsive behavior (promiscuity; distancing herself from friends) begins to unearth memories of childhood abuse, causing her to make more bad choices in an effort to alleviate her pain. When her career as a newspaper reporter begins to suffer and she's issued her final warning before being fired, she decides to confront her demons head on. To emerge from her crisis, Queenie begins psychotherapy, much to the consternation of her grandmother, who sees Queenie's mental health issues as a weakness she need only be strong to overcome. The result is a novel that stares directly into the pitfalls of being black in white spaces and (through flashbacks with Tom) the challenges of interracial relationships. Carty-Williams doesn't shy from the messiness of sexual relationships, racial justice issues such as police brutality, or Queenie's promiscuity, and the narrative is all the more effective for its boldness. This is an essential depiction of life as a black woman in the modern world, told in a way that makes Queenie dynamic and memorable. Agent: Deborah Schneider, Gelfman Schneider/ICM Partners. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


New York Review of Books Review

junk, by Les Bohem, read by John Waters. (Audible.) Waters, a Hollywood veteran both in front of and behind the camera, narrates the Emmy-winning screenwriter's epic story of an alien takeover of Planet Earth, set in present-day Los Angeles. TOO much is not enough, by Andrew Rannells, read by the author. (Penguin Random House Audio.) The star of "The Book of Mormon" and "Girls" on HBO recounts his coming-of-age from a sexually confused Midwestern teenager to finding his footing as an actor in Manhattan. QUEENiE, by Candice Carty-Williams, read by Shvorne Marks. (Simon & Schuster Audio.) The "Endeavour" actor gives voice to a 20something Jamaican-British journalist navigating the trials of interracial dating, in a tale so full of humor she's been called a "black Bridget Jones." sal & gabi break the universe, by Carlos Hernandez, read by Anthony Rey Perez. (Listening Library.) This mystical middle-grade novel set at a magnet school in Miami lends a Cuban-American lilt to the genre of science fiction. remembering Roth, by James Atlas, read by the author. (Audible.) The biographer narrates an intimate homage to the late novelist, with whom he shared a decades-long, but not uncomplicated, literary friendship.


Library Journal Review

DEBUT This long-awaited first novel from Carty-Williams presents an updated take on Bridget Jones's Diary with the story of 25-year-old newspaper editor Queenie Jenkins and her Jamaican British family. In the midst of a prolonged breakup with boyfriend Tom, Queenie experiences a miscarriage and begins to feel adrift. Carty--Williams creates a fast-paced narrative in the form of texts between Queenie and close friends Kyazike, Darcy, and Cassandra. Interspersed are chapters set in both the past and the present, focusing on the beginnings of Queenie's unstable dating history, particularly being fetishized for her ethnicity, along with her evolving relationship with Tom and the racism she experiences from his family. The author takes care when including flashbacks to Queenie's difficult childhood and current efforts to incorporate social justice work into her life, and she is at her best when describing the stigma of mental health within black communities, especially as Queenie's grandparents question her decision to see a therapist. Yet we never fully understand Queenie's yearnings for Tom or why she feels continually drawn to him, and the Daniel Cleaver-inspired character, Ted, could have been better fleshed out. VERDICT Overall, a charming read for fans of women's fiction; Carty-Williams sets herself apart with her relatable and poignant writing. [See Prepub Alert, 10/1/18.]-Stephanie Sendaula, Library Journal © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.