Cover image for Her Fearless Run Katherine Switzer's Historic Boston Marathon.
Title:
Her Fearless Run Katherine Switzer's Historic Boston Marathon.
Author:
ISBN:
9781624146541
Publication Information:
Page Street Publishing Company 2019/04
General Note:
[Hardcover]
Abstract:
Follows Kathrine from running laps as a girl in her backyard to becoming the first woman to run the Boston Marathon with official race numbers in 1967.

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Summary

Summary

Kathrine Switzer changed the world of running. This narrative biography follows Kathrine from running laps as a girl in her backyard to becoming the first woman to run the Boston Marathon with official race numbers in 1967. Her inspirational true story is for anyone willing to challenge the rules. The compelling collage art adds to the kinetic action of the story. With tension and heart, this biography has the influential power to get readers into running. An excellent choice for sports fans, New Englanders, young dreamers, and competitive girls and boys alike.


Author Notes

Kim Chaffee, a life-long New Englander and debut author, is a former second-grade teacher now focusing on writing and being a mom. She holds a BA in history and a master's in education. In addition to blogging about picture books for parents, teachers, and writers, she organizes a local annual race. She also enjoys running and lives with her family in New Hampshire.Ellen Rooney grew up watching the Boston Marathon and now spends her time as an illustrator and designer. She has her BFA from the University of Victoria. A painter, printmaker, collage artist, and debut picture book illustrator, she resides in British Columbia, Canada, with her husband.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

Kathrine Switzer turned heads when she ran-doing laps around her yard at a time when girls weren't supposed to sweat, competing with the boys' track team in college, and, in 1967, as the first woman to officially complete the Boston Marathon. Chaffee's effective telling of Switzer's iconic story emphasizes persistence, ambition, and discipline-the "pat, pat, pat, pat" of the runner's tread is a repeated refrain-but centers on her love of the sport: "She thought running was magic." When she completes the marathon, eluding an attack by a race official, she is asked why she did it, and says, "I like to run. Women deserve to run too." In Rooney's bright, straightforward illustrations, mixed media renders dramatic moments small (cutting sneakers to accommodate training-swollen toes) and large (the rage-twisted face of the race official), amplifying the empowering message. Ages 8-11. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.