Cover image for The new world : comics from Mauretania / Chris Reynolds ; foreword by Ed Park ; designed + edited by Seth.
Title:
The new world : comics from Mauretania / Chris Reynolds ; foreword by Ed Park ; designed + edited by Seth.
ISBN:
9781681372389
Publication Information:
New York, NY : New York Review of Books, [2018]
Physical Description:
268 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm.
Abstract:
"A surreal vision of a post-alien-invasion Earth where human beings still have to deal with quotidien frustrations, ennui, and understanding their place in the world. Since the mid-1980s, British cartoonist Chris Reynolds has been assembling a world all his own. On the surface, it seems much like ours: a place of cool afternoon shadows and gently rolling hills, half-empty trains and sleepy downtown streets. But the closer you look, the weirder it gets. After losing a mysterious intergalactic war, Earth is no longer in humanity's control. Blandly friendly aliens lurk on the margins of things, and seem especially interested in the mining industry. The very rules of time and space seem to have shifted: mysterious figures suddenly appear in childhood photos, family members disappear forever without warning, power outages abound, and certain people gain the power of flight. A helmeted man named Jimmy is somehow causing local business to shutter, and is being closed watched by the "trendy new police force" Rational Control. The world is being remade, but in what image?This new collection, selected and designed by the acclaimed cartoonist Seth, includes short stories, a novella, and the full-length Mauretania graphic novel. It is the ideal guide to all the mystery and wonder of one of the most underappreciated cult classics in the history of comics"-- Provided by publisher.
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1 Bob Harkins Branch REY Graphic Novel Adult Graphic Novels
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Summary

Summary

Since the mid-1980s, British cartoonist Chris Reynolds has been assembling a world all his own. On the surface, it seems much like ours- a place of cool afternoon shadows and gently rolling hills, half-empty trains and sleepy downtown streets. But the closer you look, the weirder it gets.

After losing a mysterious intergalactic war, Earth is no longer in humanity's control. Blandly friendly aliens lurk on the margins of things, and seem especially interested in the mining industry. The very rules of time and space seem to have shifted- mysterious figures suddenly appear in childhood photos, family members disappear forever without warning, power outages abound, and certain people gain the power of flight. A helmeted man named Jimmy is somehow causing local business to shutter, and is being closed watched by the "trendy new police force" Rational Control. The world is being remade, but in what image?

This new collection, selected and designed by the acclaimed cartoonist Seth, includes short stories, a novella, and the full-length Mauretania graphic novel. It is the ideal guide to all the mystery and wonder of one of the most underappreciated cult classics in the history of comics.


Author Notes

Chris Reynolds was born in Wales in 1960 and studied fine art at the North Staffordshire Polytechnic. He has worked as a filmmaker, publicist, and art teacher but now devotes his time to drawing comics. He lives in Poole in the United Kingdom.

Seth is the cartoonist behind the comic book series Palookaville and his comics have appeared in the New York Times Magazine , Best American Comics , and McSweeneys Quarterly . His illustrations have appeared in numerous publications including the cover of the New Yorker , the Walrus , and Canadian Notes & Queries . He is also Lemony Snicket's partner for the new Young Readers series, All the Wrong Questions . Seth lives in Guelph, Ontario, with his wife Tania and their two cats in an old house he has named "Inkwell's End."

Ed Park is a founding editor of The Believer and a former editor of the Voice Literary Supplement and the Poetry Foundation. His debut novel, Personal Days , was published in 2008 and was a finalist for the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award. His writing has appeared in The New York Times Book Review , Bookforum , the Los Angeles Times , and other publications. He lives in New York City.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Welsh cartoonist Reynolds has been issuing "Mauretania Comics" since 1985; this well-designed volume, edited by cartoonist Seth, provides a definitive collection of Reynolds's enigmatic work. Set on a future earth where humanity has lost a war with mostly benevolent aliens, these comics string together slice-of-life narratives with the abstract tales that arise from a universe where cause and effect no longer meaningfully apply. The protagonist is the helmeted Monitor, who looks like a mod sci-fi movie hero and travels through a mundane landscape where daily life seems oddly unchanged despite the conquest of humanity. "The Dial" explains how the aliens' religion paved the way toward their quite polite control of humans. Short detective yarns and poetic fragments lead loosely through to the introduction of Jimmy, who joins Monitor in resisting the new order and-perhaps-saving the world. The sheer denseness of Reynolds's line, which is amply cross-hatched and looks to be drawn with fat Sharpies, pervades the comics with an encroaching sense of dread. In his foreword, Ed Park frames the "aesthetic ecstasy" of these loosely plotted comics, where more questions are raised than answered. The distinctive visual style and familiar themes of paranoia and existential unease will resonate with modern audiences and provide a collectible for those familiar with the series. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

This spare work of loosely connected stories from Reynolds (Mauretania), taking place in an Earth post-alien invasion, doesn't set out to wow readers with action, worldbuilding, or deep narrative and character-building. Instead, it presents slice-of-life tales framed in an art style that often feels like peering through a window into strange and inexplicable events. Stunning black-and-white illustrations-more black than white-feature thick lines and shadows that add to the atmosphere of mystery to good effect. Verdict This New World is not for everyone; however, its interpretive nature is also its strength. Readers looking for comics that are experimental and a bit off-kilter will not be disappointed.-Lewis Parsons, Sawyer Free Lib., Gloucester, MA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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