Cover image for Shit is real / Aisha Franz. ; translation by Nicholas Houde.
Title:
Shit is real / Aisha Franz. ; translation by Nicholas Houde.
ISBN:
9781770463158
Publication Information:
[Montreal, Québec] : Drawn & Quarterly, 2018.

©2018
Physical Description:
287 pages : chiefly illustrations ; 21 cm.
General Note:
Translation of: Shit is real.
Abstract:
"After an unexpected breakup, a young woman named Selma experiences a series of reveries and emotional setbacks. Struggling to relate to her friends and accomplish even the simplest tasks like using a modern laundromat, she sinks deeper into depression. After witnessing another couple break-up and chancing upon the jilted male of the couple, Anders, at his pet store job, Selma realizes that her mysterious neighbor is the woman of that same couple. Her growing despair distances her from from her eager and sympathetic friend. One day, as the mysterious glamorous neighbor is leaving for a business trip, Selma discovers the woman has dropped her key card to her apartment. Selma initially resists but eventually she presses the key to her neighbors lock and enters."-- Provided by publisher.
Added Author:
Holds:
Copies:

Available:*

Copy
Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
1
Searching...
FRA Graphic Novel Adult Graphic Novels
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

A broken-hearted woman drifts into depression as she occupies her traveling neighbor's apartment After an unexpected breakup, a young woman named Selma experiences a series of reveries and emotional setbacks. Struggling to relate to her friends and accomplish even the simplest tasks like using a modern laundromat, she sinks deeper into depression. After witnessing another couple break-up and chancing upon the jilted male of the couple, Anders, at his pet store job, Selma realizes that her mysterious neighbor is the woman of that same couple. Her growing despair distances her from from her eager and sympathetic friend. One day, as the mysterious glamorous neighbor is leaving for a business trip, Selma discovers the woman has dropped her key card to her apartment. Selma initially resists but eventually she presses the key to her neighbors lock and enters.

Aisha Franz is a master of portraying feminine loneliness and confusion while keeping her characters tough and real. Her artwork shifts from sparseness to detailed futurist with ease. Her characters fidget and twirl as they zip through a world both foreign and familiar. Base human desires and functions alternate with dreamlike symbolism to create a tension-filled tale of the nightmare that is modern life.


Author Notes

Aisha Franz was born in Fürth, Germany and was named after an elephant from TV. She studied illustration at the School of Art and Design in Kassel and has worked as a freelance illustrator and cartoonist since graduating. Franz has published two graphic novels; her books have been translated into Italian, Spanish, and French. Her work has been exhibited in Germany, Belgium, and Italy, and she currently lives in Berlin, where she's part of the comics collective The Treasure Fleet.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Loneliness is a prison, a fog, and a wasteland in this dreamlike exploration of depression and solitude. In the aftermath of a sudden breakup, Selma finds herself alienated by everything from a laundromat's membership plan to her most intimate friends. Next door, however, lies a tantalizing oasis: a posh apartment left empty by a traveling neighbor. Selma sneaks in, and as days go by, she slips more and more deeply into a hallucinatory whirlwind of borrowed clothes, dreams of talking fish, and a growing fixation with the owner of a faltering pet store nearby and his romantic entanglements. But none of this belongs to her; the question is how she'll haul herself out of the hole she's dug. Franz (Earthling) applies a wonderful degree of surrealism to both the quotidian and extraordinary circumstances of Selma's life; her lunch dates with friends are as surreal as her dreams of life in the desert. Franz's smudgy, rounded style charms in depicting a night in with tofu dogs and reality TV, but when subtle facial expressions are needed, as in scenes where Selma lies alone in bed contemplating her circumstances, the lack of detail leaves a blank slate. Despite this, Selma's journey is an affecting one. Her trek to self-actualization is twisting and forlorn-but a road worth traveling. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

In a mildly futuristic world, Selma undergoes an awkward breakup with boyfriend Max, an experience that disconnects her from actively engaging in life and somehow forces her internal world of dreams to merge with her waking life. She's tacitly supportive of best pal Yumi, who is quite happy to overshare with her depressive friend all the glories and reveries of her blossoming relationship, which furthers Selma's alienation. Feeling a kinship with an oddly shunned fish at a local eatery, Selma imagines herself as a visitor in its aquarium as the other fish ignore it. She obsesses over a potential new love, a pet shop owner, but the connection is fraught with missed opportunities. She dreams of deserts and sometimes sex, but every exciting possibility ultimately deflates into bland nothingness. In the midst of her shifting realities, a chance finding of the key to her rich and glamourous neighbor's apartment gives Selma new direction as she explores other lives and options. VERDICT Franz's (Earthling) dream of a comic reveals a gently sad take on desire and depression that uses a loose, almost naïve pencil-line style to create an unsettling yet entirely empathic worldview worth experiencing. [Previewed in Jody Osicki's "Graphically Speaking," LJ 6/15/18.]-Douglas Rednour, Georgia State Univ. Libs., Atlanta © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.