Cover image for About Betty's boob / written by Vero Cazot ; illustrated by Julie Rocheleau ; translated by Edward Gauvin.
Title:
About Betty's boob / written by Vero Cazot ; illustrated by Julie Rocheleau ; translated by Edward Gauvin.
Author:
ISBN:
9781684151646
Publication Information:
Los Angeles : Archaia, 2018.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 27 cm
General Note:
Originally published in France by Casterman ©2017 as: Betty boob.
Abstract:
"She lost her left breast, her job, and her guy. She does not know it yet, but this is the best day of her life. An inspiring and surprisingly comedic tale of loss and acceptance told largely through silent sequential narrative"--Back cover.
Holds:
Copies:

Available:*

Copy
Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
1
Searching...
CAZ Graphic Novel Adult Graphic Novels
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

She lost her left breast, her job, and her guy. She does not know it yet, but this is the best day of her life.

An inspiring and surprisingly comedic tale of loss and acceptance told largely through silent sequential narrative, About Betty's Boob is seminal work from master storytellers Véro Cazot and Julie Rocheleau.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this joyous paean to resilience, a breast cancer diagnosis devastates then subsequently enlivens one woman's life. After a mastectomy, Betty loses her job, her love, and her self-esteem. But when she chases her windblown wig onto a cruise ship, she discovers the world of burlesque-and in it, a bright and beautiful way forward. Betty becomes Betty Boob, a defiantly one-breasted chanteuse whose setbacks become her greatest strength. Rocheleau's illustrations turn each page into a raucous, exultant ode to the art of cartooning: Betty's electric grins and the spangled backstage come alive with textural detail and deep, jewel-toned colors, and the motion of everything from Betty's performances to her encounter with a handsome entertainer nearly leaps off the page. Though certain elements border on the saccharine (the burlesque troupe is at times a bit too quirky) the tale's adherence to the reality of sickness and loss keeps it grounded. Betty's story is a charmed one, but not quite a fairy tale. Rather, it is a celebration of change, fortitude, and the healing power of art. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Salesgirl in a high-fashion boutique, Betty loses a breast to cancer, her man to instant visceral repulsion, and her job, too, since her villainous boss can't tolerate imperfect bodies among staff. After elaborate slapstick episodes in which she experiments with a prosthesis, loses her wig, and despairs of everything, Betty falls in with a troop of eccentric burlesque entertainers who help her turn her life around. In charming over-the-top sequences, Betty finds stardom on stage and a hunky new guy. She even designs both an act and a clothing line that take advantage of a cancerista's chest asymmetry instead of hiding it. Cazot's (Les petites distances) nearly wordless story finds perfect realization in Rocheleau's (La Colère de Fantômas) energetic, modernist color art, which draws on classic strip cartoons for impressive visual imagery portraying our protagonist's suffering, her attempts to survive, and-what a finale! VERDICT Winsome, erotic, and hilarious, Betty's adventures break the mold for cancer stories in pulling art and beauty out of tragedy. Women college age and up will adore it, and many fem-friendly male readers will also. Note nudity and occasional sexual episodes, always plot anchored and nicely done.-Martha Cornog, Philadelphia © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.