Cover image for The triumphant tale of the house sparrow / Jan Thornhill.
Title:
The triumphant tale of the house sparrow / Jan Thornhill.
Title Variants:
House sparrow
ISBN:
9781773060064
Publication Information:
Toronto : Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, 2018.

©2018
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : colour illustrations, colour map ; 29 cm
Abstract:
Presents the history of the house sparrow, from its beginnings in the Middle East to its spread with the growth of agriculture around the world, and discusses its population decline in recent years.
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1
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598.887 THO Book Junior Collection
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598.887 THO Book Junior Collection
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Summary

Summary

Behold the most despised bird in human history!

So begins Jan Thornhill's riveting, beautifully illustrated story of the House Sparrow. She traces the history of this perky little bird, one of the most adaptable creatures on Earth, from its beginnings in the Middle East to its spread with the growth of agriculture into India, North Africa and Europe. Everywhere the House Sparrow went, it competed with humans for grain, becoming such a pest that in some places "sparrow catcher" became an actual job and bounties were paid to those who got rid of it.

But not everyone hated the House Sparrow, and in 1852, fifty pairs were released in New York City. In no time at all, the bird had spread from coast to coast. Then suddenly, at the turn of the century, as cars took over from horses and there was less grain to be found, its numbers began to decline. As our homes, gardens, cities and farmland have changed, providing fewer nesting and feeding opportunities, the House Sparrow's numbers have begun to decline again -- though in England and Holland this decline appears to be slowing. Perhaps this clever little bird is simply adapting once more.

This fascinating book includes the life history of the House Sparrow and descriptions of how the Ancient Egyptians fed it to the animals they later mummified, how it traveled to Great Britain as a stowaway on ships carrying Roman soldiers, and how its cousin, the Eurasian Tree Sparrow, was almost eradicated in China when Mao declared war on it. A wealth of back matter material is also supplied.


Author Notes

Jan Thornhill is an author and illustrator who brings her fascination with the natural world to her books for children. They include The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk (Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Award finalist); I Found a Dead Bird (National Parenting Publications Gold Award, Norma Fleck Award, Children's Literature Roundtables of Canada Information Book Award); The Wildlife 123 (UNICEF-Ezra Jack Keats International Award, Governor General's Award finalist) and The Wildlife ABC (Governor General's Award finalist). Jan has also won the Vicky Metcalf Award. She spends her spare time in the woods obsessively collecting and cataloging wild mushrooms and slime molds. She lives near Havelock, Ontario.