Cover image for Library on wheels : Mary Lemist Titcomb and America's first bookmobile / Sharlee Glenn.
Title:
Library on wheels : Mary Lemist Titcomb and America's first bookmobile / Sharlee Glenn.
ISBN:
9781419728754
Publication Information:
New York : Abrams Books for Young Readers, [2018]

©2018
Physical Description:
52 pages : illustrations (some color), color map ; 27 cm
General Note:
Mary Lemist Titcomb (1852-1932) was always looking for ways to improve her library. As librarian at the Washington County Free Library in Maryland, Titcomb was concerned that the library was not reaching all the people it could. She was determined that everyone should have access to the library, not just adults and those who lived in town. Realizing its limitations and inability to reach the county's 25,000 rural residents, including farmers and their families, Titcomb set about to change the library system forever with the introduction of book-deposit stations throughout the country, a children's room in the library, and her most revolutionary idea of all--a horse-drawn Book Wagon. Soon book wagons were appearing in other parts of the country, and by 1922, the book wagon idea had received widespread support. The bookmobile was born!
Abstract:
"As librarian at the Washington County Free Library in Maryland, Mary Lemist Titcomb was concerned that the library was not reaching all the people it could. She was determined that everyone should have access to the library--not just adults and those who lived in town. Realizing its limitations and inability to reach the county's 25,000 rural residents, including farmers and their families, Titcomb set about to change the library system forever with the introduction of book-deposit stations throughout the country, a children's room in the library, and her most revolutionary idea of all--a horse-drawn Book Wagon."--Amazon.com.
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Summary

Summary

If you can't bring the man to the books, bring the books to the man.

Mary Lemist Titcomb (1852-1932) was always looking for ways to improve her library. As librarian at the Washington County Free Library in Maryland, Titcomb was concerned that the library was not reaching all the people it could. She was determined that everyone should have access to the library--not just adults and those who lived in town. Realizing its limitations and inability to reach the county's 25,000 rural residents, including farmers and their families, Titcomb set about to change the library system forever with the introduction of book-deposit stations throughout the country, a children's room in the library, and her most revolutionary idea of all--a horse-drawn Book Wagon. Soon book wagons were appearing in other parts of the country, and by 1922, the book wagon idea had received widespread support. The bookmobile was born!


Author Notes

Sharlee Glenn has published articles, essays, poems, and short stories for adults in periodicals such as Women's Studies , The Southern Literary Journal , and Segullah . Her primary focus, though, is writing for children. Her stories have appeared in Cricket and Ladybug magazines and she has written three picture books: One in a Billion (Horizon), Keeping up with Roo (G. P. Putnam's Sons), winner of the Dolly Gray Children's Literature Award, and Just What Mama Needs (Harcourt).


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

This handsomely designed, well-researched biography pays homage to Mary Titcomb, librarian and founder of the first bookmobile in the U.S. From a poor New Hampshire family, Titcomb doesn't take no for an answer as she pursues her education and then delivers books to a large rural Maryland population in 1905. Her library's first horse-drawn book wagon is mistaken for a "dead wagon" until she has the wheels and door panels painted a "bright, cheery red to avoid any confusion with a hearse." Numerous black-and-white photographs, articles, letters, postcards, and other archival documents are combined in scrapbooklike assemblages on goldenrod, blue, and antique white pages. The back matter includes a photographic timeline of bookmobiles through the decades, as well as a lengthy author's note explaining how Glenn (Just What Mama Needs) worked to secure a headstone for Titcomb's unmarked grave in the same Sleepy Hollow cemetery where several famous New England authors, including Nathaniel Hawthorne, lie buried. A select bibliography and index are also included. Ages 8-12. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

In 1905, when public library service in the U.S. was young, Mary Lemist Titcomb set out to serve all corners of Washington County, Maryland, by loading up a horse-drawn wagon and making the rounds. Glenn provides a basic biography of Titcomb and recounts the success of her invention. Many photographs and ephemera in a stylish scrapbook design lend interest to a rather dry text. Bib., ind. (c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.