Cover image for The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship Score [compact disc] / Howard Shore.
Title:
The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship Score [compact disc] / Howard Shore.
ISBN:
49048304
Publication Information:
[United States] : Reprise Records, 2001.
Physical Description:
1 sound disc : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Compact disc.

11/20/2001
Performers/Actors:
Contents:
The prophecy Concerning hobbits The shadow of the past The treason of Isengard The black rider At the sign of the prancing pony A knife in the dark Flight to the ford Many meetings The council of Elrond The ring goes South A journey in the dark The bridge of Khazad Dum Lothlorien The great river Amon hen The breaking of the fellowship May it be.
Abstract:
The soundtrack to the most anticipated film of the 2001 features two new songs from Enya and a score by Howard Shore (The Silence Of The Lambs, Ed Wood).
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Summary

Summary

Appropriately enough for the film adaptation of one fantasy literature's most enduring favorites, Howard Shore's score for Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings is traditional and majestic, using sweeping strings, brass, and choral sections to create moments of fire-and-brimstone menace as well heroic triumph. An ominous, bombastic feel runs through much of the score, particularly on pieces like "A Journey in the Dark," "Flight to the Ford," and "A Knife in the Dark," but Shore also includes respites such as the sweetly elfin, Celtic-tinged "Concerning Hobbits" and the stately "Many Meetings." The vibrant "Bridge of Khazad Dum" and "Amon Hen" combine the score's major themes into dazzling climaxes, while Enya's contributions, "Council of Elrond" and "May It Be," add a subtle serenity that gives the score balance. While it's not a particularly melodic score, Lord of the Rings nevertheless does an excellent job of conveying the film's moods through music and has more than enough presence to be appreciated outside of the film's context. ~ Heather Phares