Cover image for Come tomorrow [compact disc] / Dave Matthews Band.
Title:
Come tomorrow [compact disc] / Dave Matthews Band.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : RCA Records, [2018]

â„—2018
Physical Description:
1 audio disc (55 min.) : CD audio, stereo ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Title from disc label.

Songs written or co-written by Dave Matthews.

Compact disc.

Lyrics and credits on container insert.
Contents:
Samurai cop -- Can't stop -- Here on out -- That girl is you -- She -- Idea of you -- Virginia in the rain -- Again and again -- BKDKDKDD -- Black and blue bird -- Come on come on -- Do you remember -- Come tomorrow -- When I'm weary.
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Summary

Summary

Come Tomorrow arrives six years after Away from the World, by far the longest span of time separating albums in Dave Matthews Band history. During those years, DMB did what they always do: they toured every summer. This time, the group started chipping away at a new album, reuniting with many of the producers and engineers they worked with in the past. Steve Lillywhite, who helmed Away from the World, may be absent, but Rob Cavallo, the producer behind Big Whiskey & the GrooGrux King, is here, along with the R&B-savvy Stand Up producer Mark Batson and John Algia, who worked with DMB prior to their 1994 major-label debut, Under the Table and Dreaming. This laundry list of collaborators may suggest there were an awful lot of cooks in the kitchen for Come Tomorrow, yet the album is remarkably cohesive, representing a moody shift away from the settled sunniness of Away from the World. Darkness is no stranger to Matthews -- even his sunnier records have their share of meditative numbers -- but Come Tomorrow is a cousin to Some Devil and Busted Stuff, two albums that appeared in the dawning years of the 21st century that found the singer/songwriter questioning his purpose after the first flush of success. On this collection of songs, a handful of which are nearly a decade old, Matthews isn't quite as gloomy and unsettled as he was during the days after Y2K -- he throws in a handful of randy vamps and slow jams to puncture the mood -- but there's a sense that something is nagging at Matthews. That unease binds Come Tomorrow and is also articulated nicely by Matthews himself, whose weathered vocals feel appropriate weary. This leathery singing is new for DMB, as is the de facto absence of violinist Boyd Tinsley, who departed the band during the completion of this record under a cloud of sexual misconduct allegations. Without Tinsley or the late LeRoi Moore, Dave Matthews Band don't seem as loopy or rangy as they did in their prime, but this leaner sound suits a middle-aged Matthews, who is comfortable in his skin yet restless in his mind. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine