Cover image for Guyana [2018] : the Bradt travel guide / Kirk Smock ; updated by Claire Antell.
Title:
Guyana [2018] : the Bradt travel guide / Kirk Smock ; updated by Claire Antell.
Author:
Title Variants:
Bradt Guyana [2018]
ISBN:
9781841629292
Edition:
Edition 3.
Publication Information:
Chalfont St Peter, Bucks : Bradt Travel Guides, 2018.
Physical Description:
xii, 324 pages, 20 unnumbered pages of plates : color illustrations, maps (some color) ; 22 cm.
General Note:
First published 2008.
Abstract:
"This new third edition of Bradt's Guyana remains the only guidebook available to this South American gem, a jungle-clad country teeming with exotic wildlife. Thoroughly researched, easy to use and interesting to read, Bradt's Guyana is written and updated by writers who have lived in and promoted Guyana for many years and is an ideal companion for all travellers, from wildlife watchers to fishermen, anthropologists to conservationists and 'voluntourists'. This new edition of Bradt's Guyana has been updated to include all the latest developments, ranging from how to see harpy eagles at Warapoka to new culinary experiences, local tour operators, 4x4 self-drive and new hotels. Truly off the beaten track, Guyana is one of the most fascinating and least-known countries in the Americas. It is also the only English-speaking country in South America. This third edition of Bradt's Guyana is the key book to plan an expedition into its densely forested lush interior, often accessible only by boat or small aircraft, before taking some 'time to lime' in a hammock in one of its tropical waterfront resorts."-- Provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

This new third edition of Bradt's Guyana remains the only guidebook available to this South American gem, a jungle-clad country teeming with exotic wildlife. Thoroughly researched, easy to use and interesting to read, Bradt's Guyana is written and updated by writers who have lived in and promoted Guyana for many years and is an ideal companion for all travellers, from wildlife watchers to fishermen, anthropologists to conservationists and 'voluntourists'.Guyana is a destination on the rise, described - justifiably - by the tourist board as 'South America Undiscovered'. This new edition of Bradt's Guyana has been updated to include all the latest developments, ranging from how to see harpy eagles at Warapoka to new culinary experiences, local tour operators, 4x4 self-drive and new hotels.Truly off the beaten track, Guyana is one of the most fascinating and least-known countries in the Americas. It is also the only English-speaking country in South America. The jewel in its crown is the mouth-droppingly beautiful Kaieteur Falls, which is nearly five times the height of Niagara and the world's tallest single-drop waterfall. Culturally Caribbean, its capital Georgetown is a curious melting-pot of quaint Dutch and British colonial architecture, steel drums, boisterous nightlife, rum shops with world-class rum, cricket and tropical sea breezes. It is also the gateway to the lush interior which is full to the brim with fascinating flora and fauna including monkeys, black caiman, harpy eagles, giant anteaters, otters and the mighty jaguar. With Bradt's Guyana, discover all of this, plus where to stay in community lodges and see the rainforest through the eyes of Amerindian guides, where to watch turtles nesting on the beach, how to explore the moody Essequibo river (the largest between the Orinoco and the Amazon), and how to visit the million-acre rainforest reserve of Iwokrama for the ultimate authentic wildlife experience. This third edition of Bradt's Guyana is the key book to plan an expedition into its densely forested lush interior, often accessible only by boat or small aircraft, before taking some 'time to lime' in a hammock in one of its tropical waterfront resorts.


Author Notes

Kirk Smock (www.kirksmock.com) is a freelance writer and tourism consultant from the US. He lived in Guyana with his wife for 2½ years while she fulfilled a public health fellowship in Georgetown. Since Kirk left Guyana in late 2007, he has remained actively involved with tourism development in the country while working on the Guyana Sustainable Tourism Initiative, a USAID-funded project. Kirk currently lives in Baltimore with his wife, their son and two cats - one of which is Guyanese. His work has appeared in several publications.This edition has been updated by Claire Antell, a Latin American travel specialist who has promoted South America for many years as a tour operator, UK representative, marketing consultant, freelance writer and Executive Secretary of the Latin American Travel Association. Claire fell in love with Guyana in 2004 when she first visited the country on a familiarisation trip and realised she was in one of the continent's last frontiers for tourism where the mouth-droppingly beautiful Kaieteur Falls is still a well-kept secret and the rainforests, savannah and local Amerindian villages offer some of the most authentic and pristine experiences in the Americas. Since then she has returned every year to Guyana to explore and promote it to intrepid travellers around the world and has represented the destination in major consumer and travel events around the world.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Most lodges are small, family- or community-run affairs that welcome visitors as old friends. Expect to be called by your first name, often upon arrival, and to be remembered should you ever return. Tourism in Guyana is different from most places; it's far from polished and can entail hiccups. But it's exactly this unpolished and unpretentious tourism that creates a unique experience that often leaves visitors feeling as though they have stumbled upon a rare, nearly undiscovered tourism gem.    Towards the end of my own travels researching this book I visited Shell Beach, and during one afternoon I walked the endless beach alone for an hour before sitting down to write. I noted that I was on the northern coast of South America, waves of the Atlantic lapping at my feet, a wall of coconut palms to my back and the tracks left from a nesting green sea turtle on my right.    There was no sign of civilization in any direction and for the umpteenth time during my travels in Guyana I felt as though I had stepped into something larger than the present, something that diminishes all that mankind has created in this world, both good and bad. It was nature, in a raw, unaltered, almost timeless state that made me feel insignificant. It was a welcome and humbling feeling.    It's this sense of experiencing a rare natural world that I associate with travelling in Guyana. The pristine nature, the rich biodiversity, the endangered species, the incredibly varied ecosystems: they're all here, but there is always an underlying threat posed by the immediate gains of development and exploitation of natural resources.    Guyana is thankfully increasingly looking to ecotourism as an economically feasible way of conserving and preserving the country's natural riches. Many Amerindian communities are turning away from the wildlife trade, mining and forestry and looking at tourism as a means of bringing income to their villages while preserving their resources for future generations.    The communities are told over and over that they have all of the necessary components to create an ideal ecotourism destination. Lodges are built, trails are cut and guides are trained. During my visits to community tourism projects I found myself fielding similar questions from those who run them: What are we doing wrong? Why aren't we getting many visitors?    Indeed, they are doing nothing wrong. The guides are excellent, the lodges comfortable, the nature pristine; everything is in place. The problem is that Guyana remains a virtual unknown. Villages and people can't depend on tourism without enough visitors to make it possible. I only hope that this book will arouse a bit of interest in Guyana and cause others to take a chance and veer off the beaten path on their next holiday. Excerpted from Guyana/2 Bradt by Smock All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.