Cover image for The race to save the Romanovs : the truth behind the secret plans to rescue the Russian imperial family / Helen Rappaport.
Title:
The race to save the Romanovs : the truth behind the secret plans to rescue the Russian imperial family / Helen Rappaport.
ISBN:
9781250151216
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : St. Martin's Press, [2018]
Physical Description:
xxviii, 372 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map, genealogical table ; 25 cm
Contents:
By way of a beginning -- Happy families -- 'Some catastrophe lurking in the dark' -- 'Alicky is the cause of it all and Nicky has been weak' -- 'Every day the king is becoming more concerned' -- 'Port Romanoff by the Murmansk Railway' -- 'I shall not be happy till they are safely out of Russia' -- 'The smell of a Dumas novel' -- 'Please don't mention my name!' -- 'I would rather die in Russia than be saved by the Germans' -- 'The baggage will be in utter danger at all times' -- 'Await the whistle around midnight' -- 'It is too horrible and heartless' -- 'Those poor innocent children' -- 'His Majesty would much prefer that nothing...be published' -- Postscript : 'Nobody's fault'?
Abstract:
"Investigating the murder of the Russian Imperial Family, Helen Rappaport embarks on a quest to uncover the many international plots to save them, why they failed, and who was responsible. The murder of the Romanov family in July 1918 horrified the world and its aftershocks still reverberate today. In Putin's autocratic Russia, the Revolution itself is considered a crime and its one hundredth anniversary was largely ignored. In stark contrast, the centenary of the massacre of the Imperial Family will be a huge ceremony to be attended by the Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church. While the murder itself has received major attention, what has never been investigated in detail are the various plots behind the scenes to save the family--on the part of their royal relatives, other governments, and Russian monarchists loyal to the Tsar. Rappaport refutes the accusation that the fault lies entirely with King George V, as has been the traditional claim for the last century. The responsibility for failing the Romanovs must be equally shared. The question of asylum for the Tsar and his family was an extremely complicated issue that presented enormous political, logistical and geographical challenges at a time when Europe was still at war. Like a modern-day detective, Helen Rappaport draws on new and never-before-seen sources from archives in the United States, Russia, Spain and the United Kingdom, creating a powerful account of near misses and close calls with a heartbreaking conclusion. With its up-to-the-minute research, The Race to Save the Romanovs is sure to replace outdated classics as the final word on the fate of the Romanovs"-- Provided by publisher.
Holds:
Copies:

Available:*

Copy
Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
1
Searching...
947.083 RAP Book Adult General Collection
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In this international bestseller investigating the murder of the Russian Imperial Family, Helen Rappaport embarks on a quest to uncover the various plots and plans to save them, why they failed, and who was responsible.

The murder of the Romanov family in July 1918 horrified the world, and its aftershocks still reverberate today. In Putin's autocratic Russia, the Revolution itself is considered a crime, and its anniversary was largely ignored. In stark contrast, the centenary of the massacre of the Imperial Family was commemorated in 2018 by a huge ceremony attended by the Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church.

While the murders themselves have received major attention, what has never been investigated in detail are the various plots and plans behind the scenes to save the family -- on the part of their royal relatives, other governments, and Russian monarchists loyal to the Tsar. Rappaport refutes the claim that the fault lies entirely with King George V, as has been the traditional claim for the last century. The responsibility for failing the Romanovs must be equally shared. The question of asylum for the Tsar and his family was an extremely complicated issue that presented enormous political, logistical and geographical challenges at a time when Europe was still at war.

Like a modern day detective, Helen Rappaport draws on new and never-before-seen sources from archives in the US, Russia, Spain and the UK, creating a powerful account of near misses and close calls with a heartbreaking conclusion. With its up-to-the-minute research, The Race to Save the Romanovs is sure to replace outdated classics as the final word on the fate of the Romanovs.


Author Notes

Helen F. Rappaport was born in 1947 in Bromley. She is a British historian, author, and actress. She studied Russian at Leeds University where she was involved in the university theatre group and launched her acting career. After acting with the Leeds University theatre group she appeared in several television series including Crown Court, Love Hurts and The Bill.

In the early nineties she became a copy editor for academic publishers Blackwell and OUP. She also contributed to historical and biographical reference works published by Cassell and Readers Digest. She became a full-time writer in 1998, writing three books including An Encyclopaedia of Women Social Reformers in 2001, with a foreword by Marian Wright Edelman. It won an award in 2002 from the American Library Association as an Outstanding Reference Source. Her 2008 book Ekaterinburg: The Last Days of the Romanovs received many positive reviews in both the UK and US where it became a bestseller.

Her titles include: Joseph Stalin: A Biographical Companion, Conspirator: Lenin in Exile, Magnificent Obsession; Victoria, Albert and the Death that Changed the Monarchy, and Capturing the Light: The Birth of Photography. In 2014 her title, The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In this devastating, complex, and fast-moving narrative, everything from monarchical rivalries to sickness and bad weather play into the brutal demise of the Russian imperial family in 1918. Historian Rappaport (Caught in the Revolution) begins this gripping story in 1894 with the marriage of Nicholas Romanov, heir to the Russian throne, and Hessian Princess Alix, who, like her grandmother Queen Victoria, carried the potentially lethal hemophilia gene. Kaiser Wilhelm facilitated the doomed match, but in a couple of decades Russia and Germany were at war, and revolutionary fervor was rising in Petrograd. Rappaport rehashes some history from her previous books and gives salient new details on British procrastination and backpedaling in offering asylum to the imperial family after Nicholas's abdication in March 1917. She describes the confusion within the provisional government about what to do with the ex-czar and the misguided hope that Kaiser Wilhelm might make the family's safe exit from Russia a condition of the armistice ending Russia's involvement in WWI. Relying on fresh archival material, Rappaport dispels some mystery about secret Western rescue plans-that is to say, she clarifies that they were nonexistent. Regarding myriad Russian monarchist rescue plots, she admits that rumors and misinformation make unraveling the truth "an impossible task." This is a well-researched account of a colorful, suspenseful, and tragic series of events. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Best-selling author Rappaport (The Romanov Sisters) unravels the complicated relationships across Europe on the eve of World War I. The tragic fate of the Romanovs is well known, and many have questioned why they were not saved by relatives who were in power in other countries. Rappaport explains the intricacies that prevented the rescue of the tsar and his family. A mixture of Hanover family politics and fear that the revolution in Russia would catch on across the continent contributed to the difficulties in freeing the Romanovs. Sadly, as happened with the Habsburgs and Marie Antoinette, the tsarina was often blamed for the faults and mistakes of her husband, making her an equal target for the rage of the revolutionaries. The author does an excellent job of explaining complicated family dynamics, particularly teasing out how each person is related. She also portrays the heartbreak after each near miss at averting the tragic murder of the family. Verdict Recommend for anyone with an interest in Russian history, particularly during the time of empire. Rappaport's latest will also interest those seeking more insight into the complex relationships among European monarchs pre-World War I.-Sonnet Ireland, St. Tammany Parish P.L., Mandeville, LA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.